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I'm new to 3D printing. I've made some projects before just fine, but this project is giving me problems.

I 3D printed a trumpet mouthpiece, and the printer made supports inside the mouthpiece funnel. I can easily remove the exterior supports, but I don't know how to get to the supports inside. Does anyone know how I would do that?

Here's one image. Here's another.

Here is the link to the model enter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ Btw nice bannana in fhe background😁 $\endgroup$
    – Tim Li
    Dec 6, 2019 at 11:10

3 Answers 3

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That model didn’t need supports. Most of the time you can break the connections with the supports to the model by inserting a knife or flat object into the cavity. In this case you could use a probe to loosen the joins then wedge it out. If that doesn’t work you can use needle nose pliers to remove prices.

Your best and cleanest option would be to reprint the mouthpiece without supports at all. Print it so that the wide section(the section touching your mouth) is on the buildplate.

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    $\begingroup$ the item needs to be turned 90° though: stand on the mouth area. $\endgroup$
    – Trish
    Dec 4, 2019 at 17:37
  • $\begingroup$ It just needs to be oriented so that the wide opening is flat the surface. A trumpet mouthpiece is symmetrical at all vertical angles. $\endgroup$
    – Tim Li
    Dec 4, 2019 at 20:21
  • $\begingroup$ ...which is a 90° turn around either the X or Y axis because of the shown orientation. $\endgroup$
    – Trish
    Dec 4, 2019 at 20:22
  • $\begingroup$ Ok I’m not good at axies $\endgroup$
    – Tim Li
    Dec 4, 2019 at 20:24
  • $\begingroup$ They always confuse me. ;) $\endgroup$
    – Tim Li
    Dec 4, 2019 at 20:25
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Based on the photo provided, there's a strong possibility that you can print that model without internal supports. The angle of the walls falls within the limits of just about any FDM/FFF printer. An exception to this would be if you had a structure internal to the cone of the mouth piece which needed support.

ERROR: I neglected to note that your print is created "laying down" rather than vertically. This certainly complicates the printing/support problem. I typically print cylinders without internal support, although it does result in a small amount of droopies within the cylinder. Those are easily cleared away as required and much more easily than a full support forest.

Is it impractical for you to consider to cut the model in half, print both segments, remove the supports more easily, then glue them together?

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    $\begingroup$ I see what you mean. I'm reprinting it with the mouth-part facing down. Thanks! $\endgroup$ Dec 3, 2019 at 1:51
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    $\begingroup$ @VictorResnov - I think you'll be a lot happier with the print results reprinting as Fred suggests. The print lines will work/look a lot better than how it is now. $\endgroup$ Dec 4, 2019 at 0:49
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"Don't use supports"<-- that is the best answer.

Warning

Sadly, if you print vertically, you end up with an extremely fragile piece -it'll snap between layers. The OP properly printed horizontally for strength, and possibly by using a very "thin" layer height he can get by without supports. That's the only way to succeed.

I guess I should state that this answer assumes you want to use the print in a trumpet. If it's purely for decoration, then definitely print vertically.

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