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I'm new to printing resin miniatures for Dungeons & Dragons and most of my prints are successful, i.e. one or more miniatures print as expected.

However when I have multiple minis on the build plate the one in the middle works okay but the ones on the edges don't adhere to the build plate.

Should I limit myself to one or two minis in the center of the build plate? Or should it work and I just need to get my settings correct?

Note I'm using a Beam 3D Prism printer.

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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to 3dPrinting.SE! $\endgroup$ Apr 26, 2020 at 1:50

5 Answers 5

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You can definitely print full build plates of minis. You just need to find correct settings. If nothing sticks to the build plate - then you should increase bottom exposure time. Also check if the build plate is even. You can also sand your build plate a little bit to make adhesion better. Additionally, print with lower print speeds to increase success. Finally, if your FEP is worn out and scratched or hazy, you should replace it.

I own a company producing 3D printing resins. We also write extensive printing guides from time to time. You can read more on finding correct settings in this article of mine.

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    $\begingroup$ Thanks for the comment. I'll update the answer to make my affiliation clearer. $\endgroup$ Mar 18 at 7:19
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Check the plate and be sure that it is level. Also, you need to check that your model is level.

The problem will be in the settings if everything is level.

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You can fill the plate as much as you want, as long as the playing figure is not at the edge of the plate (can create problems). The problem could be that the plate is too smooth or that it is not perfectly level. If the plate is too smooth you could use some sandpaper to make it rough.

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I regularly print multiple models on the build plate of an Elegoo Saturn. If your built plate is level and your tank is firmly fastened down you should have no problems.

What I have found is the my slicer (Chitubox) will sometimes corrupt the base layer if I print multiple models. With me this usually causes the bottom layer to be deformed, and to have jutting protrusions that were not on the original layer, or for the slicer not to recognize the base layer as being flat.

The second picture shows an example of how the skate or one model was deformed. The small pieces of cured resin are corrupted data and aren't part of any model or support structure. They were not visible in Chitubox unless I manually rotated the object view and saw little visual glitches.

I would advice that you check your sliced files.

See the example image:

enter image description here

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ sounds like an old version oc the slicer $\endgroup$
    – Trish
    Mar 20 at 20:16
  • $\begingroup$ No, it's the latest stable build. But it's not my thread. $\endgroup$ Mar 20 at 20:21
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Open your file in your slicer, and set it to only view the bottom few layers. Spin the view around several times and view it from different angles. Look for odd shadows or lines.

If it looks anything like the below image then the problem isn't with your printer, it's with the file that you've just sliced.

enter image description here

For some reason the slicer no longer sees its own raft as being flat, and it is creating floating geometry that sometimes breaks loose.

I've found that I can sometimes resolve this problem by reducing the size of the raft. About 105% usually does it for me. Otherwise the problem might be the geometry of the models that you're printing. I tend to print off models that I've made myself, so it's quite possible that it's something that I've done, or the way that I've exported the STL files.

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