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I have a problem with the grid infill on my BCN3D+ Dual Paste extruder: when I print a structure the lines of the infill are not evenly printed, every two lines the gap between the lines is higher (see the photo) while in the Simplify printing preview (preview image) the space between the infill lines is the same all the time. Do someone know if it can be a problem of the printer or a Simplify command?

Simplify preview

printing

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    $\begingroup$ What kind of extruder is that? $\endgroup$
    – Trish
    Sep 14, 2020 at 13:28
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    $\begingroup$ My guess is that the nozzle assembly just isn't rigid and is deflected according to the last direction it moved or something like that. $\endgroup$ Sep 14, 2020 at 15:00
  • $\begingroup$ It happens with different printing materials (ceramics before calcination) and today I tried with another 3D printer (same model) and It didn't happen, so it should be something of the printer itself, it is a BCN3D+ double paste extruder $\endgroup$
    – Ilaria
    Sep 16, 2020 at 10:56

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It looks like a case of one axis affecting the other. This is a subset of cases where things are not rigid enough. Basically the movement direction in X is causing an offset in the Y, or whatever you want to call the axes. It is present in small amounts in all screw-driven setups where the screw essentially acts as a wedge, and can be in others for various other reasons. The solution is to tighten up your linear bearings/slides so that there is less transverse play.

There is also a chance that you are trying to print beyond the resolution of your printer, in which case it is "rounding" to the nearest within its capabilities, but that seems less likely.

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  • $\begingroup$ how does this correlate with the information given? The BNC3D is not screw driven on the X axis - it is belt driven. $\endgroup$
    – Trish
    Sep 23, 2020 at 18:43
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    $\begingroup$ The correlation is in the direction of one axis affecting the other axis. There are other ways such as having a belt connection location not directly in line with the effective CG (center of force?) of what it pulls. It's fairly easy to check for by moving and watching the nozzle and the solution is the same regardless of belt or screw - adjust the linear control elements to reduce transverse slop. $\endgroup$
    – Abel
    Sep 23, 2020 at 19:14

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