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I have a serious problem and I can't find a way to solve it because I have no idea why is it happening. For some reason the things I print get really messy, like a mountain range growing on the print. It looks like overflow but it can't be because I'm already using 0.82 flow modifier and if I go any lower the printout will fall apart as the extrusions won't touch at all. I've double checked my extruder steps and my filament and also my nozzle width, all are set up correctly. The whole thing looks like the printer is over-extruding just in some parts of the print. enter image description here

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It definitely looks like over extruding. But similar effect can appear with proper extruding (or not too much exceeded) but with too high temperature.

If it appears only on some parts of the first layer then it can be:

  • bed leveling issue (or eventually bed is bent)
  • caret mechanism issue (dispositioned/bent)

You can also check different speeds just to be sure.

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Your printer could be calibrated too close to the bed: if your slicer is set to use a 0.4mm first layer height, but the printer actually moves the nozzle 0.2mm from the bed, then you will get this result.

If this is the case, the first layers look over extruded and squashed, while layers after sparse infill has been printed will look fine. The support structure will in this case give room for the extra filament, making the extrusion look normal again (although it probably was fine all along).

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  • $\begingroup$ That might really be the issue. I'll look into it $\endgroup$ – DELTA12 Jul 1 '16 at 9:43
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This is happening on the first or second layer, correct? It looks like your nozzle is trammed too close to the build plate. If there is less gap between the nozzle and bed than the slicer expects, it will over-extrude the first layer. That tends to produce "bacon" patterns of ripples on the bottom of the print as the plastic gets unevenly squeezed out to the side of the strand.

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  • $\begingroup$ You beat me to it by 3 minutes! :-) $\endgroup$ – Tormod Haugene Jun 29 '16 at 20:40

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