0
$\begingroup$

After a year of printing smaller models, I finally went to print something that would take up most of the build plate from left to right and realized that my nozzle cannot reach "true" X home.

As seen in this picture: enter image description here the X-axis endstop does not allow a true X0, thus losing me precious mm of print space! I over-exaggerate, but truly is there any way to shift the X-axis more to the left or the Y axis/build plate more to the right to gain full bed usage?

Additional photo showing that the actual hotend plate is hitting the endstop: enter image description here

Is this an Ender 3 problem in general that I have missed in my internet searches on this or is it just a manufacturing lottery that I unfortunately lost?

$\endgroup$
1
  • $\begingroup$ "True" home is where the endtops are. $\endgroup$
    – Trish
    Jan 22 at 6:55
1
$\begingroup$

The rated build space for the Ender 3 takes into account the few mm of inaccessible bed width at the Xmin side, along with a similar strip at the Xmax where the hotend carriage runs into the bracket that holds the wheels for that side's Z frame. If your slicer has an Ender 3 profile, the space it allows you to use will print on the Ender 3 (unless you have bull clips holding a glass build surface in place; then they'll interfere, but mainly on the Ymin and Ymax edges).

Don't forget, even though your actual bed is 235 mm square, the usable build volume is rated as only 200 mm square (by 225 mm high).

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

You do have hit the true home. You will have to physically move the endstop to alter that position. Your problem is, that the endstop-home is on the build area - and that is printer dependant. My Ender 3 has about 4 mm diagonal distance from the bed in its physical home, for which I accounted via a firmware swap, including a "virtual" firmware home.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.