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I need to print a rotor for a DC motor I'm designing. In the process of testing the behaviors of the motor performances, I would need a material that will not deform at a temperature range between 100 °C to 150 °C.

Since I don't have a 3D printer yet, I would like to know what would be the best choice for my need. I was planning to buy an Ender 3, but I'm not sure this entry-level 3D printer will allow me to obtain the results I'm looking for. I'm excluding PLA material because I think it's the most "fragile" material from this point of view and for my needs.

My questions are:

  1. Which material should I use in order to have a 3D printed object (rotor) that will not deform at a temperature that varies from 100 °C to 150 °C?
  2. Can an Ender 3 (planning to use full metal hotend and also hotbed) be used to print the filament that is heat resistant? Should I buy a resin 3D printer?
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    $\begingroup$ I think there should be only one question per "question". $\endgroup$
    – FarO
    Jan 26, 2021 at 14:21
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    $\begingroup$ The problem with two questions is you have two different answers to two different questions, but you are only allowed to select one as answering your question. $\endgroup$
    – Perry Webb
    Jan 26, 2021 at 19:50
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    $\begingroup$ This question would be better off by splitting the 2 questions in 2 separate questions. The current accepted answer does not answer the question in the title, that seems a bit odd. Either change the title, split the questions or rewrite the question to be more about the materials. I don't see a simple Ender printer be able to print e.g. PEEK. This might involve heavy modifications, NASA has done some effort including infrared lamps with that respect. $\endgroup$
    – 0scar
    Jan 27, 2021 at 12:45
  • $\begingroup$ thanks oscar. I will edit my question asap $\endgroup$
    – Carlo
    Jan 27, 2021 at 17:20
  • $\begingroup$ If you print the part with PLA (for ease of printing), you can then create a mould with high-temperature silicone and use that to cast pewter. In case that gives you some useful ideas. $\endgroup$ Jan 27, 2021 at 18:28

2 Answers 2

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PEEK (poly ether ether ketone) has a glass transition temperature of 145 ‎°C (293 °F).

Melting temperature 345 ‎°C (653 °F)

Nozzle temperature 370 - 410 ‎°C

Heated bed 120 - 150 ‎°C


Polycarbonate has a glass transition temperature of about 147 °C (297 °F)


Polypropylene has a glass transition temperature is 215 °C


Polymaker PolyMide CoPA (specialized Nylon) Filament has a softening temperature of ~180 °C, but they don't specify the glass transition temperature. Other materials have the glass transition temperature about 5 °C below the temperature the material softens.

However, the glass transition temperature is only an indication of a physical change: while uncommon, a material may be rigid enough well above it's glass transition temperature. How to interpret various thermal-related filament properties?

A side issue to consider as far as layout is FDM prints are weakest between layers (layer separation), so you want a layout where this affects your print the least.

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  • $\begingroup$ Polymaker CoPA (nylon, modified) should not deform up to 180°C. $\endgroup$
    – FarO
    Jan 26, 2021 at 14:21
  • $\begingroup$ Does glass transition mean that it will start to deformate at that temperature? (ie for Polypropylene 215°C) $\endgroup$
    – Carlo
    Jan 26, 2021 at 14:56
  • $\begingroup$ Glass transition means it is starting to move from solid to liquid, but doesn't have a distinct melting temperature with heat of fusion. The material gradually gets easier to deform as the temperature goes above the glass transition temperature. $\endgroup$
    – Perry Webb
    Jan 26, 2021 at 16:39
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    $\begingroup$ @PerryWebb it depends, it's not a clear distinction. Plastics deform permanently also below the glass transition temperature (creep), and some are use routinely above their glass transition temperature without deformation. It's just a physical parameter that typically relates to a sudden increase of plasticity, but not always... $\endgroup$
    – FarO
    Jan 27, 2021 at 9:01
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    $\begingroup$ H/LDPE, POM, PP all have glass transition temperature below 0 °C but still are perfectly solid at room temperature. See omnexus.specialchem.com/polymer-properties/properties/… $\endgroup$
    – FarO
    Jan 27, 2021 at 9:04
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Using an Ender 3 for high temperature materials is possible but you need to enclose it to be able to heat the air up to 100 °C.

It's quite involved and it would be much better, if it's something you do seldomly, to have the parts printed professionally.

Many thing start warping or breaking at 100 °C.

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