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I've got a new heatbed. The current heatbed has a screw in the middle of the bed with some kind of thermal paste (feels like silicone). Somebody on reddit said that it is very unlikely silicone, because the curing process of silicone corrodes the electronics. But what is it and should I use just normal CPU thermal paste?

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    $\begingroup$ There's a difference between the silicone you might use to seal around a bath, which sets, and silicone heat transfer compound, which stays fluid. An example of the latter is 860 Silicone Heat Transfer Compound. Does the CPU thermal paste you might use have a high enough operating temperature? $\endgroup$ – Andrew Morton Mar 11 at 15:13
  • $\begingroup$ @ AndrewMorton i got this thermal paste (sorry this is german) it goes up to 240°C and is non electrically conductive. Seemed alright to me $\endgroup$ – rehfore Mar 12 at 9:29
  • $\begingroup$ I assume that from the mention of the screw in the bed that that is what physically holds the thermistor against the bed. Just be careful about where the diamond paste goes as it is an abrasive (e.g. you would not want it getting into bearings). $\endgroup$ – Andrew Morton Mar 12 at 11:41
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If you need it to hold the thermistor in place, there are thermally conductive electrically insulating potting compounds, such as Appli-Thane® 7300 Urethane that have a temperature range of -100 to 160 °C.

The newest CPU thermal pastes contain silver particles and will conduct electricity. So, it needs to stay away from leads and pads that don't want to be shorted

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  • $\begingroup$ thanks that is good to know, my thermal paste says it is 'non electrically conductive' but i didn't knew before that was even something to look out for $\endgroup$ – rehfore Mar 12 at 10:18

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