2
$\begingroup$

Ive been experimenting will multiple color filament but the colors a more or less blended. Is there are filament that goes from one color directly to another without having transition color ex. red to green immediately.

I've been tinkering with Filament Hub Filament and it is very good (some of the best I've ever used) however I've had to essentially melt strands of one filament to the next and this is unsustainable.

Anyone know any filaments or methods to have an immediate color change

$\endgroup$
2
  • $\begingroup$ Welcome to 3D Printing SE and thank you for your contribution. When you get a chance, please take the tour to understand how the site works and how it is different than others. $\endgroup$
    – agarza
    Apr 14 at 17:31
  • $\begingroup$ Really, the best way to control when a color changes is to have multiple heads (one color each), and code in tool changes where you want a color change. $\endgroup$
    – Davo
    Apr 14 at 17:35
3
$\begingroup$

It takes at least a few cm of extrusion to purge the old color before switching to a new one due to mixing in the melt zone, and possibly much more depending on the particular pigments. If the old color is something bright like red and the new one is white or something close, it can even take many tens of cm before you get a clean new color.

Multi-color extrusion setups either use separate hotends per color or fancy retraction setups where each color can be retracted separately, along with purge towers. You cannot get a clean color switch in the print just by having one in the input filament, and this is probably why all the mixed color filament that's sold is blended - so customers don't get disappointed when it doesn't work like you expect.

$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

Anyone know any filaments or methods to have an immediate color change

There is a solution (or multiple) where you can have multi color filament without a gradual transition from one to the other color (seen from the filament side, not the extrusion/nozzle side), i.e. immediate color change. This requires an additional piece of equipment to do this automatically, or could be done even manually1).

There are systems that calculate what color is needed for which part of the extrusion process and cut and pastes (welds) multiple colored strands of filament to a single strand of filament, see e.g.:

Mosaic Palette 3 Pro

If you look closely, you see that the single filament strand is composed of various colored strands welded together (4 colors, fifth being welded).

Using multiple colors and single hotend wil require an extra extrusion of the new color to purge the hotend for a clean and crisp change. Slicers are already equipped to to this task for you, these are called purge towers, they print alongside the print and prevent too much blending of colors.

Printed part and purge tower Source Peter Leppik


1)Note that an expensive device is not specifically necessary, with a little effort you can do it yourself. This requires slicing the part for multi colors (including a purge or printing purge tower to prevent mixing of colors) and parse the obtained G-code file to find all the respective lengths of the colors. These are easily found as a color change implies a tool changing script to be active in the G-code file, summing the individual lengths you could created your own filament by welding the individual colors together. Now remove the tool changes from the G-code file and you have created a "manual" multi-color print using a single hotend and extruder.

$\endgroup$
4
  • $\begingroup$ among the machines that can do this is the Palette system $\endgroup$
    – Trish
    Apr 15 at 12:35
  • $\begingroup$ @Trish I did not want to be too obviously hinting to an expensive solution ;-), but yes this is an option. There have been opensource and Kickstarter attempts. $\endgroup$
    – 0scar
    Apr 15 at 13:17
  • $\begingroup$ Prusa MMU2 does it without welding iirc. $\endgroup$
    – Trish
    Apr 15 at 13:19
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Correct, and that works too! So does the SMuFF. Either way, you need to purge a certain amount to account for the mixing problems. $\endgroup$
    – 0scar
    Apr 15 at 13:31
0
$\begingroup$

When calling for a manual color change, Marlin is set up to allow to extrude extra filament. This is to ensure that the new filament is in the hotend, but it also allows to "purge" the old color from the hotend by extruding till no mixed color comes out anymore.

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

There is a way that you'd be able to do it but its not really conventional and could use up some filament:

Calculate out where you want it to stop. Then, when you want to change colors, you set your slicer to print a floating object in the air that isn't part of your print to purge out the old filament and prime the new one.

That way, when it goes back to the print, there won't be any of your old color. You will just have to pause the print when you get to the point where you want to change color, and make sure it's not over your print, then takeout the old filament, and put the new one in.

Then let it purge, and you can grab the string of filament before it goes to the print. Or just pluck it off when the print is done. This is the only way that I could see this working without multiple spools of filament and multiple extruders.

$\endgroup$
2
  • $\begingroup$ Welcome to 3D Printing SE and thank you for your contribution. When you get a chance, please take the tour to understand how the site works and how it is different than others. $\endgroup$
    – agarza
    Apr 15 at 23:38
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ It might also be worth using a full purge tower or ooze shield to eliminate the need for mid print intervention or extra post processing. I might add a little more detail about how one accurately calculates the lengths for splice overs, too. $\endgroup$
    – Rykara
    Apr 16 at 6:51

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.