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I just ran a 3D benchy on my Lotmaxx SC-10 3D printer and it came out fantastic. No stringing, melting, the dimensions look good, the bed adhesion is perfect, and it is identical to the 3D model. But upon closer inspection, there is this funny-looking scar on the print that I have noticed on many prints before. It was even on the very first print I did on the printer.

A picture of it: enter image description here

What is causing this problem and what can I do to fix it. It only happens to one side usually only once or twice. Whenever the scar happens twice, they are on the same side but far apart from each other.

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Those marks are the Z Layer seams, or the point where your printer stops moving in X/Y to move up one layer width and begin on the next layer. Unfortunately, These marks are unavoidable, but you can tune them to be less severe with your retraction settings. Most slicer software available today should have a configurable option for 'Seam Alignment' that you can set to Random in order to space these marks randomly throughout the part, though this will mildly slow down the print. More advanced slicers such as PrusaSlicer are also capable of 'Seam Painting' where you can draw on your part where seam marks are acceptable. You may also be able to reduce them by setting your slicer to print External perimeters before internal perimeters.

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    $\begingroup$ Random is the worst possible choice; it just distributes them all over the print rather than isolated along a single seam. What you want to do is fix them. This is usually a matter of tuning pressure advance/linear advance, speeding up your retract/unretract (so as not to dwell there a long time retracting/unretracting, oozing the whole time), and possibly adjusting slicer options about the order of wall printing. $\endgroup$ Jul 10 at 0:26
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    $\begingroup$ It depends, A random distribution may be easier to mask or sand off post-processing wise. I'm not overly familiar with linear advance, so if you would like to post another answer or edit mine with the additional information feel free! $\endgroup$
    – craftxbox
    Jul 10 at 2:37
  • $\begingroup$ This is great advice, I am a novice at the Cura slicer but I will try to check what you all suggested and I will comment on my findings. Thanks. $\endgroup$ Jul 11 at 15:52

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