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Are there any common chemicals that will damage, degrade or erode (Causing pitting, for example) the most common types of resin used in an SLA printer once it has been cured?

For example, chemicals found in household cleaning products, paints, or motor vehicle maintenance, or hobby\crafts?

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  • $\begingroup$ What do you count as common? Hydroflouric Acid is a commonly used chemical in the industry, but you will have your problems getting your hand on it - besides that it would eat your build surface. $\endgroup$
    – Trish
    Sep 25 at 14:25
  • $\begingroup$ I've amended the subject line to include the word "household", but I would think that the average reader would be able to determine the context from the examples given, which include household cleaning products and hobby\craft supplies. Though you might not realize it, hydroflouric acid is actually a common ingredient in cleaning products. It's used in pool cleaner and products for cleaning fragile ceramics. $\endgroup$ Sep 25 at 15:34
  • $\begingroup$ HF in the needed concentration to dissolve resin is what is used to etch glass. As in concentrated HF. Only very diluted acid is used in metal cleaners, in concentrations that are far from what is used in the industry, and even that is a dangerous chemical. $\endgroup$
    – Trish
    Sep 25 at 16:13
  • $\begingroup$ This is getting a little off topic. I'm only really interested in whether there are common chemicals that might degrade cured resin. For example, whether the spray that you use to polish a display cabinet might damage prints in it, or if other hobby supplies might do something similar. $\endgroup$ Sep 25 at 17:10
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NOPE

UV-cured Resins are Duroplastics. Most of them are chemically inert to anything short of concentrated strong acids does nothing to them. Even strong acids such as sulphuric acid (battery acid) will take quite some time to work on it - if it works at all.

If you have access to metal or glass etching equipment, those acids might have a chance, though that is not exactly household equipment. My best bets would be concentrated phosphoric, sulphuric, nitrous, and of course hydroflouric acid. But you don't want to work with concentrated hydrofluoric acid if you can avoid it.

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  • $\begingroup$ Acids used to create a patina on home made jewellery, check. $\endgroup$ Sep 25 at 17:11

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