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I'm building a workspace for 3D printing for a project. I'm in the tropics so at this point it's just a large concrete pad with a roof next to my workshop. This is a very hot humid country.

I'm assuming keeping it open will be as cool as possible (if that's even something that's needed) unless I air condition a room which will be pretty expensive and I'm not sure I could afford that for the months the project will run. Also less worry about any fumes. The printers will not have enclosures. Thirteen to 14-year-old kids will be doing the actual printing, I'm just setting up a production line for them.

At this point, we're looking at getting Ender 3 printers and printing with PLA filament if the type makes a difference.

Is there anything I need to worry about with a setup like this? I still have a while before we can get any actual printers, so I can wall it if need be.

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Many plastics are hygroscopic so the humidity may be a concern. You should research the effects of plastic that has absorbed too much humidity so that you can recognize it if it becomes a problem.

If you are getting a large amount of plastic, I would recommend getting air tight containers to store it in (I use a 5 gallon bucket with a lid that has a rubber gasket) and desiccant and a method to re-dry the desiccant. (I use a toaster oven to bake the desiccant until it changes color.)

If you actually do have problems with humidity, you may also want to get or build a filament dryer. In extreme cases, some people feed the printer directly from the dryer, but most plastics are not that sensitive.

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    $\begingroup$ Re: the OP concern over warm weather, that part is actually a good thing, cooling plastic warps less because it shrinks less. $\endgroup$ Nov 7 '21 at 16:30
  • $\begingroup$ I could store the filament in an aircon room with my servers I guess, not much humidity in there $\endgroup$
    – Kilisi
    Nov 7 '21 at 20:36
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    $\begingroup$ Sounds like that could be a plan. Might still want the buckets, but if the A/C keeps it dry enough, you could skip the desiccant. $\endgroup$
    – user10489
    Nov 7 '21 at 21:24
  • $\begingroup$ Beware of moving cold filament out into a warm, humid environment. Condensation will occur... $\endgroup$
    – BobT
    Nov 12 '21 at 23:44
  • $\begingroup$ Actually, that would be a great reason for using the air tight buckets. Keep the bucket open in the cold dry A/C. Before use, close the bucket and bring it outside and let it warm up (with the dry air still inside). When the filament is above the dew point, the bucket can be opened. Of course, this assumes this is actually a problem on a given day. $\endgroup$
    – user10489
    Nov 13 '21 at 13:08

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