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  • Total beginner, not a single print yet
  • Snapmaker original

I saw a couple of tutorials telling one to design whatever needs printing on Fusion 360 and then export it to STL, import on Luban1), and print.

For CNC, I could import a post-processor and the resulting G-code worked fine without having to deal with Luban.

I know Fusion 360 doesn't have the exact machine on the library, but I'm wondering if I could get away with something similar or if there is a post-processor that I could install.


1) Snapmaker Luban is a free, open-source slicing software tailor-made for Snapmaker machines.

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One way to completely avoid Luban is to use OctoPrint, and the OctoPrint plugin for Fusion 360.

Loading the G-code from the USB flash drive can lead to weird behavior, where the Z-axis gets a bit lost. Online printing with luban or OctoPrint worked better so far.

Whatever you do, don't turn off the option in Fusion to start from the home position and set up a reasonable one. Mine went from the homing axis straight to print, including a gash over the plate that was in the way...

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    $\begingroup$ usually, Fusion's CNC solution assumes you jog a CNC and 0 against the piece, starting in all negative space (above and away from the 0). This can be seen in that the fusion generated CNC code does not contain a homing command usually. $\endgroup$
    – Trish
    Commented Feb 3, 2022 at 9:26
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    $\begingroup$ @Trish yes, but that's not the case with the snapmaker. Once you turn it on, it will "home" the axis and leave the nozzle with a lower Z than the bed. If you disable the default option of "start from", it will move from the homing position straight to where t wants to start the print, and it's strong enough to dent the aluminum bed.. $\endgroup$ Commented Feb 4, 2022 at 6:55

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