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I have to set my print flow setting extremely high (up to 180 % and more) as otherwise, I get an under extrusion. I have also noticed that from time to time I have to update that setting to an even higher value.

Question: Is my feed motor broken? Or do I wideness the slow death of it? Or is the calibration getting lower after a while (I would not know why/how this is possible, but still)?

I am using:

  • Cura as slicer (correct 3D printer selected)
  • Ender 3 Pro
  • 0.4 mm Nozzle
  • ERYONE PLA Filament 1.75 mm PLA 1.75 mm 3D Printing

Similar Question: Why is my 3D printer over extruding when I have set the flow rate very low

Edit: @Oscar pointed me to have a close look at the extruder and found a very used feeder-weel: enter image description here Could that be my problem?

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    $\begingroup$ Look at the extruder lever, when broken, which is very common, this can happen. There is a recent similar question. I'll link it later. $\endgroup$
    – 0scar
    Jan 29 at 12:30
  • $\begingroup$ @Oscar Thanks for your input. The Lever looks fine. I have updated my question, as the feed-weel might be the Problem. Do you mind having a look at it?! $\endgroup$
    – Paul
    Jan 29 at 14:06
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    $\begingroup$ It does look a bit worn. $\endgroup$
    – user10489
    Jan 29 at 15:08
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    $\begingroup$ It's hard to tell from the photo, but it looks like there is a set screw on that feed-wheel which would make replacement fairly easy; finding a replacement is a different matter. $\endgroup$
    – agarza
    Jan 29 at 16:58
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    $\begingroup$ If worn, the feeder gear doesn't grip the filament, and hence slips. You need to compensate for a larger extrusion length as you encountered. Looking at the feeder gear, I don't know where the filament is being gripped, but there sure are parts of the teeth missing, you need to replace the feeder gear. $\endgroup$
    – 0scar
    Jan 29 at 19:54

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If the feeder gear has worn out, the feeder gear doesn't grip the filament, and hence slips. You would then need to compensate for a larger extrusion length, as you encountered, by e.g. bumping up the flow modifier.

Looking at the feeder gear, I don't know exactly where the filament is being gripped, but, there sure are parts of the teeth missing and some parts are shiny brass colored indicating wear, you need to replace the feeder gear.

It has been reported that some of these feeder gears are crimped onto the stepper shaft, but from the photo you posted a hint of a grub screw can be seen, which would simplify replacement.

Quick fix:

Losen the screw on the feeder gear and adjust the height of it. This way the filament is being fed by not-worn-out teeth (set it above the groove you can see in the question picture). A replacement of the gear is recommended anyway!

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    $\begingroup$ @Paul I've accepted your edit, but I encourage you to post it as a separate answer! It seems a valid quick fix while a spare is on its way! $\endgroup$
    – 0scar
    Jan 30 at 12:02
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    $\begingroup$ @Paul Trying to work through to a root cause - it could be that your extruder has been pushing against some resistance. Do you remember having a blockage in the past? Or has the printer been used for something tougher than PLA? Could be your hotend is providing too much resistance, or the Bowden tube is burned ? $\endgroup$
    – Criggie
    Jan 30 at 21:49
  • $\begingroup$ @Criggie After the quick fix I still have to set the flow rate fairly high (better print results though), but if I remember correctly that was always the case (i bought a new device). I have mostly used the same PLA. I have not noticed any resistance, yet, but I will make sure to disassemble the extruder head and have a closer look at it. Thanks a lot for your very important thoughts!!! I really appreciate it. $\endgroup$
    – Paul
    Jan 31 at 9:26

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