5
$\begingroup$

I am on the hunt for CAD packages which can perform some level of slicing as an inherent model feature, instead of either exporting to STL and then importing into the slicer (a la OnShape) or directly opening the slicer from within the software (a la Fusion 360). I would like this because I want to model directly for the print instead of having to go through an iterative process where certain tools cannot be used to their fullest extent.

For instance, it's very easy for me to print a model, measure it to quantify shrink, and then backport required changes into my CAD model. However, this is not ideal as it prevents me from analyzing the model before print. (For instance, using the CAD software to calculate mass, C.G., moment of inertia, or doing mechanical and thermal analysis on the printed shape, not the modeled solid.)

In a perfect world, I'd have the ability to run Cura as an operation on the model. The resulting CAD would then include the infill structures as well as any required modifications to the original part, e.g. a discrepancy between the desired height and the printed height or a wall width vs the nozzle width.

Is there anything out there which fits the bill? I know nothing is perfect, but anything right now would be a big step forward.

$\endgroup$

2 Answers 2

2
$\begingroup$

Blender has a CNC slicer plugin, it's not exactly what you're asking for but it can perform some of the tasks that you're asking for.

CNC slicer for Blender

$\endgroup$
1
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Thanks! Unfortunately, as you point out it wouldn't meet the need to do in-CAD analysis and modification. $\endgroup$ Jul 9 at 14:58
0
$\begingroup$

Microsoft 3d builder will do it. It's far from the best CAD or Printing software though. Works very well for what it is.

$\endgroup$
8
  • $\begingroup$ Could be promising. Could you provide some links to this functionality? $\endgroup$ Jul 11 at 14:25
  • $\begingroup$ It comes inbuilt with Windows 10, lots of instructions online for it $\endgroup$
    – Kilisi
    Jul 11 at 22:31
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ That's good to know. I don't mean to give you a hard time, and I appreciate your input. Nonetheless, SE answers should have corroborating documentation, i.e. links. They should not simply an assertion. $\endgroup$ Jul 11 at 23:52
  • $\begingroup$ Not giving you a hard time, but you've spent more effort typing that than it would to have typed the keywords into a search engine and gotten hundreds of links. ;) $\endgroup$
    – Kilisi
    Jul 11 at 23:55
  • $\begingroup$ Think of SE answers as canonical documentation for everyone who has the same question. If each user searches for his/her own answer, then there's little uniformity, as the answer will depend on the search engine, the user profile, etc... To avoid this, the answer should do more than be an assertion and should instead provide justifications. 3dprinting.stackexchange.com/help/how-to-answer gives a good overview of how answers ideally would be. $\endgroup$ Jul 12 at 0:37

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .