4
$\begingroup$

I am currently writing a printer.cfg Klipper file for my Tronxy VEHO-600. It is quite a challenge as there is not much info regarding this printer online.

Is recovery velocity something that I have to tune while the printer is operational, or can I give it an arbitrary value?

I have a CFG file for a VEHO-600 that a friend of mine put together, and he has it set to 300, but his printer is modified, so I'm unsure if this value would be the same for my standard VEHO-600. Hoping someone can advise me of what the feature is, so I can tune it myself.

$\endgroup$
1
  • $\begingroup$ Did you manage to assemble the printer.cfg for your VEHO 600? Could you share the file? I have the same problem. $\endgroup$ Commented May 26, 2023 at 22:41

2 Answers 2

1
$\begingroup$

Recovery velocity refers to the maximum speed at which the printer's extruder can move while recovering from a pause or filament change. When the printer is paused or filament is changed, the filament is retracted to prevent oozing and to ensure a clean start. Recovery velocity determines the speed at which the extruder moves during the priming process.

It should be set based on the capabilities of your printer's extruder and the speed at which it can reliably prime itself. If the value is set too high, the extruder may not be able to keep up, resulting in under-extrusion or other issues. If the value is set too low, the priming process may take too long, resulting in wasted time during the print. Typically, it is set higher than the normal printing speed.

$\endgroup$
0
0
$\begingroup$

The only "recover velocity" I'm aware of is the one for pause_resume functionality and should just be a reasonable travel velocity for your printer (probably the same as your max velocity if that's set correctly). 300 is quite low, probably fine for the X and Y axes of any printer that's running 24V motors or higher. The only potential problem might be if your max_z_velocity isn't set to limit Z; if it's not, resuming after pause where the toolhead is parked near the point where it was paused would put nearly the entire 300 mm/s on the Z axis. That's fine if you have a Z limit set to limit it, but if you don't, it would fail on most printers. So just make sure your Z velocity limit is set right and you should be fine.

$\endgroup$

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .