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My silicone sleeve dislodged from the heater block. Surprisingly, Prusa firmware correctly detected crash, pushed it out of the way and resumed print.

I can just print without it, but I would prefer to have it on as it speeds up heating noticeably. What can I use to secure it in place? I don't want to risk failed prints in the future, so unless I know it's not coming off, I'm not putting it back on.

photooftheissue

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  • $\begingroup$ Is this the original sock? If yes, how old is the printer/sock? If the sock has been replaced, how old is this replaced sock? (approximate times are sufficient). $\endgroup$
    – agarza
    Commented Dec 3, 2023 at 15:34
  • $\begingroup$ @agarza there is no original sock for prusa mk3s+. It is aftermarket one i got about a week ago. Third print with it on. $\endgroup$
    – Mołot
    Commented Dec 3, 2023 at 15:44
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    $\begingroup$ I thought that it may be old but now I think it was manufactured incorrectly. $\endgroup$
    – agarza
    Commented Dec 3, 2023 at 16:05
  • $\begingroup$ @agarza feel free to post it as an answer, and I'll even provide a photo of how it broke ;) $\endgroup$
    – Mołot
    Commented Dec 4, 2023 at 23:46

3 Answers 3

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Mechanical

As agarza correctly noted, glue is a nogo for it will be permanent. But mechanical fixing is a way too. Don't forget the simple mechanical way to make sure the silicone sock won't get lost: a simple wire around it will keep it in place.

If unbroken, the silicone will clamp that way itself, but if cut or broken, that clamping might not happen.

Kapton Tape

High-temperature tape, usually from Kapton, is often used to secure things to the heater block, and can be used to wrap around a broken or damaged silicone sock to keep it stable. It also can, on itself or with a high-temperature resistant insulator, be used to make a sock, because Polyimide is temperature resistant to up to 400 °C. For a high-temperature printer, you even might want to replace your sock with several layers of polyimide tape, acting as a decent (but not perfect) insulator on its own.

At times, Kapton tape and fiberglass weave are used in very high-temperature applications to create isolation layers. Generally, in this form a woven fiberglass mat is preferable. However, wrapping the heater block can be... quite fiddly and looks not very pretty.

don't ruin your sleeves!

However, OP also mentioned that they printed ASA at 250 °C. Silicones start to break down at 230 °C, so cooking the sock will harden it, then it will break and lost. That can not be prevented.

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  • $\begingroup$ +1 Good catch! There is the key; the high temp is causing the sock to crack. $\endgroup$
    – agarza
    Commented Dec 6, 2023 at 15:10
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    $\begingroup$ @agarza and... I just realized that Kapton actually would work as a replacement for the sock. And get off decently. $\endgroup$
    – Trish
    Commented Dec 6, 2023 at 15:12
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Since the Prusa MK3S+ does not come with a silicone sock then it is a third-party item. That said, some third-party manufacturers either don't have the actual specifications to make a proper silicone sock or they decided not to put a lot of effort into the design/creation of the sock. Therefore, the silicone sock is not a "perfect fit" on the Prusa MK3S+ and is/will be prone to falling off.

As to how to keep it from falling off, therein lies the problem. Any adhesive that can withstand the high temperatures of the heat block will probably make the connection nearly permanent.

It may just be a matter of trial and error to find a silicone sock that will fit snugly on the heat block.

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  • $\begingroup$ i.sstatic.net/AfXf7.jpg - actually, sleeve just broke when used with ASA at 250°C $\endgroup$
    – Mołot
    Commented Dec 5, 2023 at 8:42
  • $\begingroup$ @Mołot It could be that the sock is made out of some low-quality materials, and the heat caused rapid degradation leading to cracking. $\endgroup$
    – agarza
    Commented Dec 5, 2023 at 14:17
  • $\begingroup$ @Mołot 250 is above the 230 that any silicone starts to cook off at. $\endgroup$
    – Trish
    Commented Dec 6, 2023 at 15:24
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You can buy metal zip ties. For example, Harbor Freight has a package of 25 12" stainless steel ties for $5. With a 115 lb load capacity, these are massive overkill for your application, but they're cheap and they'd give a nice clean look.

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