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I'm not new to 3D printing, but am not extremely conversant in doing mechanical adjustments on the printer.

I took the printer down (minimal de-construction), loaded it into a padded box and drove it to my new home when I moved last year to avoid the handling that it would receive from movers.

Since then, I cannot get the bed to level properly regardless of what I do with the leveling screws. No matter what I do, the left rear corner is way too high for the nozzle and starts to scrape if I try to move it into place. I've tried every adjustment that I can find/think of other than taking the printer apart and re-building it (which I do not want to do if I can avoid it). I'm using the (often recommended) yellow springs that I bought off of Amazon and have a glass print bed.

Any suggestions how I can level the bed without taking the printer apart?

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    $\begingroup$ Hi John, welcome to 3DPrinting.SE! Pictures are generally very welcome, is it possible to add some to provide context. E.g. you day you have a glass bed, that should be very flat. Place a ruler on its side over the bed to check the level of the glass. If that is straight, you need to look further into the Y-axis construction or the portal itself. $\endgroup$
    – 0scar
    Jan 11 at 22:29
  • $\begingroup$ I will take pics this weekend and will update the post. Thank you! $\endgroup$ Jan 16 at 15:42
  • $\begingroup$ Where do you live? I want to move there! Very long weekends over there! 😉 $\endgroup$
    – 0scar
    Feb 12 at 22:06
  • $\begingroup$ What does "minimal deconstruction" mean? Photos of the screws and what's happening when you turn them could be a great help as well. $\endgroup$
    – Mołot
    Feb 13 at 14:23

2 Answers 2

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It may be that the surface the printer is sitting on is not planar. That can deform the frame slightly or cause a soft foot condition. Either of those can result in Y guide rods being non-linear. The cure, if that's the case, is either adjustable feet or shimming the high foot/feet.

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Step 1: remove the glass and clean up its underside as well as the aluminium base. Some sort of debris stuck under the glass is often the cause.

Step 2: Tighten the eccentric nuts on the bed rollers (then tighten the screws holding them). At least some of the rollers are mounted on special nuts that can be turned to move the roller away/into the rail, make sure all the rollers can be turned with some resistance, loose=no grip, no turn=too much friction.

Step 3. Besides surface, as Allardjd instructs, check for crud stuck to underside of the printer legs. A twist in the frame can introduce this sort of problem.

If all else fails, invest in an auto bed leveling probe, it solves this sort of problems automatically and it's a huge quality-of-life improvement.

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