8
$\begingroup$

PTFE tubes are typically delivered coiled up. And because they are quite stiff, they always want to spring back to their original curvy shape, making them harder to route properly.

Is there a way to straighten them out?

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ I've considered using a heat gun, but I'd like to be sure I can do it without damaging the tube. Has someone tried this before? (If you have, go ahead and create an answer, rather than replying with a comment.) $\endgroup$ – mhelvens Jan 13 '17 at 19:31
  • $\begingroup$ I just live with the bent-ness. If they are in the extruder, the tube straightens them. If they are a guide for the plastic then the filament straightens them as much as matters.. If you are having issues you might have too thick of a tube. Heatgun likely wont help due to the super high melting point. $\endgroup$ – StarWind0 Jan 13 '17 at 21:47
  • $\begingroup$ @StarWind: I guess I don't like how they bend. In my setup, they sometimes get caught behind something while the printer is working. So I would like to exercise some control over that. One way would be to use a drag chain, but that seems overkill. $\endgroup$ – mhelvens Jan 13 '17 at 22:14
  • $\begingroup$ I hated the tubes! I ended up ditching them and mounting my filament directly above the printer to avoid using the tubes. $\endgroup$ – tbm0115 Jan 18 '17 at 16:38
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @tbm0115: But there are practical advantages to using the tubes, like [1] You can feed your filament from an almost entirely sealed container to keep out moisture, and [2] the moving print-head won't experience sudden forces pulling on the spool from various directions (causing artefacts in the print and tangles on the spool). $\endgroup$ – mhelvens Jan 19 '17 at 18:37
4
$\begingroup$

I just plugged the ends of tube and soaked it in real warm water for 5 minutes then stretched it out on a table. That helped then the hard part I spooling it up against the arch and soaked it again. This seem to work the best.

| improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$
2
$\begingroup$

You could use a hairdryer to introduce a spot-bend where you need it.

| improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Hi and welcome to SE.3DP. SE is a Q&A website. Could you expand upon your answer a little as it is a bit terse? Also, I've made it more of a statement, rather than a question. $\endgroup$ – Greenonline Apr 30 '19 at 17:58
2
$\begingroup$

A colleague of me puts spring steel wires in the tubes and leaves the tubes on the central heating for a certain amount of time (probably hotter than 60 °C).

| improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.