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Whenever I try putting the filament through the nozzle it does not go through. I have searched everywhere online and have found nothing.

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  • $\begingroup$ What have(n't) you done and please elaborate on what is going on. $\endgroup$ – tbm0115 Jul 13 '17 at 16:14
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Many printers have a problem with inserting filament into the extruder. Cutting it at an angle is a huge help. It is also very possible that you have a cog or a bad extruder nozzle.

This link could be of some help: Extruder is not feeding.

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    $\begingroup$ It would be wise to summarize key points from that link to keep the information in case the link is no longer valid. $\endgroup$ – tjb1 Apr 18 '17 at 16:41
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    $\begingroup$ From How do I write a good answer?: Provide context for links - Links to external resources are encouraged, but please add context around the link so your fellow users will have some idea what it is and why it’s there. Always quote the most relevant part of an important link, in case the target site is unreachable or goes permanently offline. $\endgroup$ – Greenonline Apr 30 '17 at 17:15
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My first step would be to cut the filament at a bit of an angle. This will help the filament enter the extruder correctly.

If you're still having trouble, you may have a clogged nozzle. This article by Lifewire -3D Printer Extruder Nozzle Clogged? Here Is How To Unclog It has some good info.

I've also heard stories about the Bowden Tube (the PTFE tube that guides the filament from the extruder to the hotend) becoming warped or melted in cases where the printer's temperature control went awry. This is rare as PTFE doesn't melt until 320°C.

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  • $\begingroup$ As @tjb1 states above: It would be wise to summarize key points from that link to keep the information in case the link is no longer valid. $\endgroup$ – Greenonline Apr 30 '17 at 17:13
  • $\begingroup$ From How do I write a good answer?: Provide context for links - Links to external resources are encouraged, but please add context around the link so your fellow users will have some idea what it is and why it’s there. Always quote the most relevant part of an important link, in case the target site is unreachable or goes permanently offline. $\endgroup$ – Greenonline Apr 30 '17 at 17:15
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I think my PTFE shaft is in reverse when it was assembled and sent out. One side is the metal shaft only the other side the PTFE inner shaft. I read about filament shavings from poor feeding, so it wouldn't make sense initial feeder takes on hard metal where it might shave it and obstruct ease, also the nozzle and the filament must need well heat so it doesn't make sense the PTFE is screwed in nearest the nozzle, rather the metal should conduct against it. Thus also the thermal reading would be off from it not applied to the actual filament just around it. In bike breaks it's to prevent the scraping of the metal chord against the metal housing upon where it exists the housing. One of the video's suggested using twisty ties for the belt as well, with four extra pieces same as two which are used on the track at the bed, a non one time use disposable clamp can be made with extra screws, for each instead of the twisty ties, so it stands to reason likely however it maybe the sales/distribution form manufacture has poor communication or not at all instructions is how these discrepancies arrive. IN MY OPINION. Reverse the shaft from extrude to the nozzle if you don't see Teflon at the extrude part, I have not tested it myself yet, but I'm going to. My unit as well seems poor ability to print at all.

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