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I mean 3D forms like these? In a small scale (height: 1-2 cm, width: 0.5 cm).

Detailed 3D form#1

Detailed 3D form#2

I want to keep all the form's details.

If it is possible, what printer do you advise? How much does it cost to print one piece like that in terms of ink? And what is the most permissive software for this kind of printing?

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    $\begingroup$ The material used for 3D printing is called filament for FDM printers, and resin for SLA printers. $\endgroup$ – Tooniis Jul 1 '17 at 13:25
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Sla printers would be the best, but if you are using an FDM printer, set it to a lower speed and male sure you get the orientation right so that most of the edges don't get ruined by supports. You should also get a higher quality 0.2mm nozzle and set it to the lowest layer height you can achieve on your slicer.

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Best option for something like this would be to use an SLA printer. They can do sharper image detail compared to FDM style printers.

That being said, printing something like this poses its own set of challenges. In order to print a part, some surface needs to be in contact with the built platform, and depending on which surface chosen, you will end up with having some amount of overhang, or undercut. Not an issue in and of itself as these can be supported with support structures. For the size that you're looking at printing though, removal of the support material will be a bigger challenge.

As for costing of this, that's not something that this forum is used for, but these structures don't look absurdly difficult to print. If you were to contact a local print shop, or check on Google for an online print house, they will be able to give you costing on printing these.

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You could use something like a Stratsys Objet 30 Pro.

The printer uses layers of liquid deposited on a bed and cured with UV light, instead of extruded plastics. This just means that the level of detail you can achieve is far higher than that typically achieved by a conventional ABS or PLA printer. That being said, the materials and machine hours tend to be more expensive than conventional printers (about 40% higher in the specific facility I am exposed to).

If you are well versed in 3D printing, you could play around with the air-gapping (forced overlapping of layers due to z-axis head positioning in ABS and PLA). Can cause wear on the head, and takes some playing with but in some cases has yielded me a higher perceived level of detail. Also, makes some part features stronger.

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Don't waste your time on SLA or FDM machines.

If you use SLA, it might print but you risk breaking the sharp edges during support removal and FDM is just a another level of pain for support removal.

Print this using SLS and Polyamide 2200 or PA 12, they both are the same material.

Should come out of the machine exactly the way you need with those sharp edges intact.

SLS technology does not require any support material.

You should be able to get it printed at any professional service bureau near to you, just google to find them.

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