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So I've seen some very good design software, but almost all of it is very expensive. I'm just wondering if there's a good cheap design software out there.

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    $\begingroup$ Are you seeking technical model creation or artistic model creation or a combination/balance of the two? On what platform will you use the software? $\endgroup$ – fred_dot_u Oct 23 '17 at 19:50
  • $\begingroup$ This question is depending a lot on personal preference. What makes a design software good for your use? $\endgroup$ – kamuro Oct 26 '17 at 22:39
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OnShape is free for students and the public and is very similar to Fusion 360. It works online on almost any device and was built by some of the engineers from Solidworks. Free accounts can not have any private documents so anyone can see your design. If you know how to use Solidworks/Inventor you will be able to pickup Fusion 360/OnShape very quickly.

OpenSCAD is also free but works through its own programming language. It requires a strong math background and some understanding of programming to use as it has no GUI tools.

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    $\begingroup$ OpenSCAD does not require a "strong" math background unless you are going to create some intricate designs. For simple shapes and even a few more-than-simple shapes, it's quite good and easy to learn. I recommend OpenSCAD not as a single tool in the toolbox, but an additional resource. $\endgroup$ – fred_dot_u Oct 23 '17 at 19:48
  • $\begingroup$ And I can create very intricate designs in Inventor with even less of a math background. $\endgroup$ – tjb1 Oct 24 '17 at 11:04
  • $\begingroup$ @fred_dot_u - OpenSCAD requires a strong background in dealing with the abstract, which a math background would certainly help with. $\endgroup$ – William Oct 24 '17 at 17:42
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Try Fusion 360. It's free for educators, students, enthusiasts and start-ups. It's not 100% intuitive, but once you learn the basics, it probably has all the facilities that you will ever need for mechanical design.

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