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Materials used in space need to not outgas significantly

An answer to this question: Would 3d-printed objects outgas in vacuum?

referred to the NASA outgassing database which showed that ABS, PET, and PLA filaments are all fairly low outgassing and suitable for space application.

What I'm wondering is whether there are any 3D-printable plastics that are both suitable for space and also self-lubricating. Nylon is the obvious printable self-lubricating material, but I believe that it outgasses too much (I don't think NASA has tested nylon filament, at least I can't find it in the database).

My primary interest is in hobbyist-grade, FDM printers but if there are materials that can be commercially 3D printed, that is also of interest.

Any ideas?

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    $\begingroup$ The ones I can think of are Polyamide, PET, POM, FEP, Taulman 618 and igus iglidur. Have you already looked into any of these? $\endgroup$ – Foad Jan 12 '18 at 15:47
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    $\begingroup$ Polyamide outgasses. PET is already on my list, but I don't think it's self-lubricating? POM doesn't seem to be in the databases. FEP looks promising as far as outgassing, but is it self-lubricating? Talulman 618 isn't in the databases, but seems to be a variant of Nylon, which outgasses like crazy. Iglidur seems to do well with outgassing. Is it self-lubricating? You may want to change your comment to an answer. $\endgroup$ – jgalak Jan 13 '18 at 4:34
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Well, I think this depends on your machine. If you can support extrusion temps north of 350C and bed temps ~150C, you could try PEI:

https://www.3dxtech.com/ultem-9085-3d-printing-filament/

I believe PEI has self-lubricating properties, and has outgassing of ~0.40% TML (PET is ~0.43%). Of course, most off-the-shelf printers don't handle that sort of temp range. But then, industrial grade materials are likely to require industrial grade machines. :)

You could compare other DBs to NASA's as well.

Outgassing DB: http://esmat.esa.int/materialframe.html

By the way, Nylon has an outgassing aspect >2.0% TML, which is definitely on the high side for vacuum applications.

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    $\begingroup$ Yes, I'm familiar with that DB, and yes, nylon outgases too much (though filament, specifically, is not in their DB, other nylon products are). $\endgroup$ – jgalak Nov 6 '17 at 21:40
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I would suggest material from IGUS . https://www.igus.com/wpck/17736/3Dprinting

They have a range of materials that are astonishingly easy to print with on desktop 3D printers also they are probably the world leaders in high load, self lubricating polymer bearings .

I despise printing with PEI (Any type of ULTEM) and PEEK filaments as the upgrades required are a pain to install and keep running for any serious 3D printing related activity .

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