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I am currently printing the QTrainer aircraft from 3DLabPrint on my Anet A8, via the supplied i3-compatible gcode files.

So far, everything has printed fine, but the main undercarriage part tries to print off the left hand side of the bed by about 5mm.

I have tried manually adding an M206 X-10 line to the gcode file, just after G28 ; home all, however this has not had any effect:

G90 M83 M106 S0 M140 S65 M190 S65 M104 S220 T0 M109 S220 T0 G28 ; home all M206 X-10 ; added by me G1 E-0.8000 F1800 G1 Z0.200 F1002 ; layer 1, Z = 0.2 T0 ; tool H0.200 W0.450 ; skirt G1 X9.382 Y10.533 F6000 G1 E0.8000 F540 G1 X10.536 Y10.537 E0.0388 F1440 ...

However this does not work and I'm not clear on whether I am using this gcode command correctly, or whether my printer simply doesn't support that command.

Is there another way I can apply an X-offset to the gcode file (or printer) to move it a few cm to the right of the print area?

As I do not own Simplify3D and cannot currently afford it, re-slicing the STL files is unfortunately not an option.

Unfortunately there is no X-adjustment on the X limit switch (although I suppose I could temporarily tape something to the print head, so that it activates the switch sooner?).

My Anet A8 currently runs stock firmware, hooked up to OctoPrint and I have access to a Macintosh desktop computer.

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    $\begingroup$ The reason that M206 does not work for you is that you are on stock firmware. This firmware is Repetier based and does not support this gcode command. If you had flashed the firmware to Marlin it would have worked fine! $\endgroup$
    – 0scar
    Apr 8 '18 at 5:58
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You can use G92 to change the coordinates the machine "thinks" it's at. If just after homing, you apply

G92 X-10

the machine now thinks it's at X = -10, while in reality it's at X = 0. This results in everything thereafter behaving as if it is shifted in the positive X direction by 10 mm (since if you then commanded a move to X = 1 the machine would move to what is physically X = 11).

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  • $\begingroup$ a very good use case for that command. Thanks Tom $\endgroup$
    – profesor79
    Apr 7 '18 at 19:13

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