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I have an incoming project and the only 3D printer available to me is the TronXY X1.

So the question is: Can it handle at least four days of continuous load or should I search for an alternate solution?

I don't want to damage (my only) 3D printer for this project.

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  • $\begingroup$ Hi Apollyon, and welcome to SE.3D Printing! I'll edit and undelete this question for you, so that it is only a 24/7 print question... actually, I've just realised that there is a heated bed question in there too. Put your heated bed question in a new question. Three lots of reputation for the price of one! :-) $\endgroup$ – Greenonline Jul 6 '18 at 18:35
  • $\begingroup$ Hi, I am not sure if you are going to ask your question about heated beds, but this might be useful: Why is a heated bed important? $\endgroup$ – Greenonline Jul 11 '18 at 12:19
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I have the same Printer - a TronXY X1, and I feel confident that with a little upgrade here and there, it can handle long prints without problems.

The most needed upgrade is a quality power brick. Mine died after some month. For replacement I have chosen a 12 V/10 A output one of a reputable supplier with warranty and it runs without any warming since.

Then, I did upgrade the hotend itself. The built in hotend can become leaky under long prints. I did fix this by exchanging it for a genuine e3d-v6 lite. Yes, only a lite, because this machine can only print PLA anyways for a lack of a heated bed - and there is little size one can add to the machine's print surface due to design limitations (one can only extend Y and Z to some degree without generating problems).

Tighteners for the X on the Z-axis and the bed are a very good idea to make the printer a little more reliable, resulting in less misprints or lost prints at upper heights due to wobble or layer shift.

Generally, I have printed some quite long prints (several 16 hours, one 28 hours), and with a reliable hotend and good filament feed (in once case the spool got jammed by a pen falling into it), the TronXY X1 did do its work quite good. Mind, that I tend to always print at 0.1 mm layer hight.

I do not know how 4 days of continuous load would work out, but my X1 has some summed up 2 weeks of prints under its belt by now, so... I think it can do this, but I would give it a general check (for example inspect if the bed is still settled tight) between prints.

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Rather than investing up front in a new power supply, consider printing with the equipment you already have; knowing in advance that the power supply may fail, but proceeding with the confidence that you can replace it if it does.

This approach won’t cost you anything to try. If it fails, it will result in only a brief outage until you replace it. If it doesn’t fail, you saved the cost of a power supply.

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    $\begingroup$ it can result in delays from shipment though - which could delay the production and upset the customer. $\endgroup$ – Trish Jul 10 '18 at 18:28
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The answer is yes, with a little of extra care maintaining your hardware cold as possible, when I started to print I mounted some PC fans where I notice that the heat will be a problem. For my printer I placed one small fan to Z motors and other one pointing to the power source connectors; I could print for 2 weeks easily. I´m using a PC power source, so this power supply has his own fan. Now I've calibrated the Z motors current, so now keeps a low temperature, the power connectors were soldered instead using the loose connectors, so now I'm using a fan for the whole shield just for extra caution.

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I know that this is a bit wishy-washy but some can, some can't.

The TronXY has a bit of an issue with the power supply to start with. The power brick is a (reportedly) bit suspect, for long jobs, see my answer to the question, Ramps 1.4 with a power brick.

It could be worth upgrading the power supply to a higher current rated PSU (20 A - 35 A), with an aluminium enclosure, i.e. those PSUs which are marketed as LED power supplies, such as this, Tronxy 3D printer accessoires power supply 240W AC110/220V DC 12V 20A for 3D print DIY kit part on AliExpress.

Then you can add your heatbed (that you refer to in your other question), without worrying.

It all depends on how critical your 24/7 project is. Is it a serious production run or just a hobby-like project that is a bit of a fun endurance test? How important is it that the print run goes without a hitch? Would a power supply failure mid-print be catastrophic or easily shrugged off? Would the delay incurred by trying to find a replacement power brick actually matter that much?

A simple analogy would be driving from Germany to Mauritania across the Western Sahara, with some serious, and urgent medical supplies. You could either either buy a well maintained, and carefully run in, Mercedes, which will most likely last the entire journey and then some, or you could buy a clapped out old Lada, with 500000 km on the clock, with the vain hope of getting there. The Mercedes would seem to be the better option.

However, if you are delivering a Dundee cake for an Aunt, which is neither time critical nor particularly important and you aren't even sure that your Aunt will be at home when you get there, then maybe the Lada will suffice.

Into which category does your 24/7 print project fall in? It sounds like the former.

Apart from the power supply, i.e. w.r.t. the stepper motors and hotend, unfortunately, I don't know the answer and can not answer your question.

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    $\begingroup$ Be sure to put a lot of preservatives in the cake, maybe change it to canned food! :) $\endgroup$ – 0scar Jul 10 '18 at 9:35
  • $\begingroup$ @0scar - good point. I was sort of thinking that myself, as I was writing it. I've changed it to Dundee Cake as they are indestructible (and delicious). Also it was Mauritania, not Mali - my memory is fading... $\endgroup$ – Greenonline Jul 10 '18 at 12:29

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