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I have a CR-10S 500 and want to change a capacitor on it to improve and solve temperature issues. This capacitor that needs to be changed should be labeled as "C4" as mentioned on this post but it's not present on my motherboard. The goal is to replace 100uF capacitor with 220uF 16V capacitor.

This is what the motherboard should look like:

enter image description here

but mine looks different. Below is what it looks like:

enter image description here

There is no version number on my motherboard and there is no "C4" capacitor. Also, the component that's labeled "330" on the original board is labeled "470" on my motherboard. It's hard to decide which capacitor to change. On my motherboard, there two capacitors instead of one, closer to the location of the capacitor that needs to be replaced. They are labeled "C42" and "C35" instead of "C4". I do not want to replace the wrong one since it's risky enough to replace just one capacitor on these boards.

Anyone know my motherboard type or version? Also, which capacitor to change?

EDIT:

Here is a better or zoomed in section of the place:

enter image description here

As Trish requested in the comment, below is also the back side of the motherboard.

enter image description here

theSealion might be right in his answer and I did a test and it all points to "C31" as he suggested but the problem is that the capacitor is different from the one it is supposed to be replaced with like on other CR-10 boards. I am not entirely sure if this is the capacitor since the type of capacitor are different from the one I was suggested to use. Below is the new capacitor:

enter image description here

My current idea is to remove the tiny "C31", solver wire to pin 4 of LM2596 and to the new capacitor but I do not want to remove the "C31" because I don't want anything to go bad.

Can I add the new capacitor parallel to the existing "C31" without removing the "C31"?

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You are looking for a capacitor that must be connected to Pin 4 of the LM2596.

Maybe you could provide a better picture of that area so we could see the different tracks on the board.

The LM2596 is in the center of the right side of the board (it is also labeled with LM2596D). The pins should be counted from top to bottom (in your picture)

My guess is, the Elko you are looking for is connected to C31, and you must look for the positive pin.

LM2596 Wiring

In this wiring diagram Cout is the capacitor you are looking for. The SMD Parts R1, R2 and CFF should be R31, R32 and C31 in your picture.

With the corresponging measurements I would say you do not need to replace the capacitors.

In comparison to the old board your board already has the "fix" implemented.

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  • $\begingroup$ I have a multi-meter to do that kind of a test. Where is LM2596? The component with 5 pins? If yes, should its pin 4 connect to the negative or positive side of the capacitor? $\endgroup$ – Programmer Nov 21 '18 at 7:21
  • $\begingroup$ I've just extended my answer. In the first version I haven't seen that the type here is not fixed but adjustable, this adds a few more SMD components. $\endgroup$ – theSealion Nov 21 '18 at 7:31
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    $\begingroup$ @0scar Ok. I misunderstood him. I just did that and I think that the result a bit twisted. The output from "C31" is connected to two capacitors not just one. The "C33" and "C32". I noticed that they are both positioned next to each other so I did a test on them and found out that the "C33" and "C32" has their positives connected together. The-same applies to their negatives. They are connected parallel to each other and I have a feeling this is one of the re-designed and fixed board. $\endgroup$ – Programmer Nov 21 '18 at 20:59
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    $\begingroup$ It looks like they tried to use two low value caps to get the-same fix with just one 220uF. Does this even make sense or should I just go ahead and change both caps with my new 220uF? $\endgroup$ – Programmer Nov 21 '18 at 21:00
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    $\begingroup$ If C33 and C32 are parallel and the positive side is connected to C31 there is no need to change them. $\endgroup$ – theSealion Nov 22 '18 at 8:32
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An important note on Voltage Rating

Just to add to the existing answers.

If you are planning on upgrading the capacitors to some with larger capacitance, then assuming that they are for the supply regulation/smoothing then upping the capacitance shouldn't be (too much of) an issue. If they are used for timing, i.e. in an RC circuit (which seems unlikely in this particular case), then the capacitance should/must be kept the same.

However, the main issue that I see is that the existing capacitors are rating at 35 V, and you are planning on adding lower rating capacitors, i.e. 16 V. This is asking for trouble and at best an early failure, or blown capacitor.

The voltage rating should be between 1.5-2.0 times the voltage of the circuit, or better still (possible overkill), double the circuit voltage and then use the next voltage rating.

So, for a 12 V circuit, use a 25 V rated capacitor, or 35 V. The 16 V is a bit of a no-no, and besides you don't want to mix voltage ratings for the same circuit, not a good idea, unless you actually want a common point of failure.

See sources: Selecting voltage rate for capacitors and High Voltage Capacitor, in a low voltage system?

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    $\begingroup$ The voltage statement is useful but the motherboard receives 12 volts so 16v cap is actually fine for 12v input. It even says 12v on the back of the picture I uploaded in the question. The 12v is converted into 5 to power the microprocessor and drive IC for stepper motors. So far, those that changed the12v cap haven't run into issues. $\endgroup$ – Programmer Nov 23 '18 at 8:12
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You are looking at the wrong board

Your board might on the surface look like a Creality v 2.0 board, and is indeed from the same family of boards. After trying to discern the parts and finally resorting to google image search, I almost had to maniacally laugh:

The currently latest version is the Creality 2.1, but your board clearly is a pre 2.0 board, as the 2.0 and 2.1 are quite similar, almost identical in the areas in question. According to the standard nomenclature, a 2.X board should be a full new engineering or vastly re-engineered board. So I looked up a Creality 1.X board - And indeed, it looks somewhat closer to a CR-10 motherboard in the area around the black capacitor, but that is marked 150/151. So it is not a Creality 1.1.2 / 1.1.3, also known as "CR-10" board.

My best guess (Confirmed by OP and this) is, that your board is an intermediate step between the Creality 1.1.x Board for the CR-10 and the new CR-10S 2.0/2.1, so by nomenclature a proto-2.0. Among Makers, it is called "original CR-10S" at times. Your numbers should thus be read from this board:

Original CR10S Board

There is a 100/35V/UT Capacity in the indicated spot in both the green and black renditions.

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  • $\begingroup$ There is CR-10 and CR-10S. My printer is CR-10S. After research, I found this post which identified each board and says that the board is "Original CR-10S Board in Green" $\endgroup$ – Programmer Nov 22 '18 at 16:02
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    $\begingroup$ Indeed, the 1.1.2/CR-10 is not your board, the 2.1 is the new CR-10 board. You have - according to your link - the CR-10S board in Green/Black $\endgroup$ – Trish Nov 22 '18 at 16:13
  • $\begingroup$ @Programmer, indeed that link Creality CR-10 and CR-10S Models – What Printer do you have? really is rather indispensable... I seem to remember it coming in useful a few months ago. $\endgroup$ – Greenonline Nov 23 '18 at 7:37
  • $\begingroup$ @Greenonline It took long to find a post with my actual motherboard. I still feel like the only person with this motherboard model since every post about this issue is not based on this motherboard. $\endgroup$ – Programmer Nov 23 '18 at 8:56

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