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My Flashforge Adventurer 3 is not printing properly. Filament feeder makes repetitive loud thumping noise and not enough filament is extruded. Resulting print (if completed) is not solid.

Results vary with filament. Flashforge brand (red) PLA works best. Any other filament fails completely unless I print at High quality, with head temperature at 235 degrees. Nozzle has been un-clogged repeatedly, but right from the start, when feeding filament in, it does not flow through properly.

I had used the included tool to clear blockages in the extruder several times before now, but after posting this question I tried again. Ordinary use of the tool made no difference. So I applied more force, and, pushed filament through by hand directly into the extruder and used a pin to try to clear the extruder. It now appears to be working adequately Not perfectly. I am able to print with default settings. It still thumps -or ticks- a bit. I am alarmed at the amount of force I had to use to clear the extruder blockage.

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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to 3dPrinting.SE! $\endgroup$ – Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 Dec 17 '18 at 21:45
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    $\begingroup$ Possible duplicate of Extruder clicks and Extruder clicking Tronxy x5s. $\endgroup$ – 0scar Dec 17 '18 at 22:45
  • $\begingroup$ Wait, you print PLA at 235°C?! That is ridiculously high for PLA. $\endgroup$ – Trish Jan 25 at 5:00
  • $\begingroup$ Had same issue, did a color transfer with same reel but cut off the filament that was in the printer, worked fine after that. $\endgroup$ – james May 13 at 20:35
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Advice from another source suggested thoroughly cleaning the feed gear on the bowden extruder. When I looked closely there were plastic flakes all over the mechanism. I used compressed air and a brush to clean it. I also discovered expert mode in the FlashPrint software, which enabled me to slow down the speed at which fill is laid down. Now I have good printing results with any filament.

EDIT AND UPDATE:: I have continued to have problems with PLA. For most of the last year I printed using ABS with no similar problems. I guess that PLA is simply rougher, scratchier than ABS and catches in the tube. I found a comment that putting olive oil on the filament fixes it. I used Vaseline. Things were fine for a while, but a retailer said this would lead to other problems.

So far, no permanent answer to this question.

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  • $\begingroup$ We appreciate that you took the time to post the answer yourself. Please accept your answer, that is perfectly allowed! $\endgroup$ – 0scar Jan 27 at 17:45
  • $\begingroup$ @0skar Thanks, but in fact my answer to my own question turns out not to be complete. I have since worked out that PLA filament is rougher than ABS and seems to catch in the tube. I have printed with ABS with no similar problems for most of the last year. I found some advice suggesting to put olive oil on the filament. I did not do this, but I did use a bit of vaseline. I was then advised this was not a proper way to deal with the issue. So the question doesn't have a suitable resolution. However, I will close the question. $\endgroup$ – Will Barrows Jan 28 at 19:26
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After a couple of hundred hours of successful (mostly) prints, I heard weird thumping of the feeder and though it fed filament it would not extract it completely for a color change. Tried a number of tricks to fix that without success. Then I read here about just using compressed air to clean the wheels and the feed channel. Voila! Success. Maybe that won't solve it the next time but it cleared this problem.

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PLA should not be printed at 235 °C. If your printer requires such high temperatures to make the filament very fluid, you have too much friction in your system, e.g. this can be caused by clogs or too low layer height printing the first few layers. Note that such high temperatures are also a cause for obstructions as the filament can carbonise creating clogs. On the other side, too low temperatures also cause too much friction or resistance.

The sound you are hearing is often referred to as "clicking" and can be caused by steps being missed or the extruder hobbed gear to skip back as a result of the friction/resistance.

Now that clicking is introduced, please look into this answer and this answer to answer your problem.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you for this information. It confirms I was not missing something basic. I had done everything I could to address the problem. That being the case, I took it back to the store and exchanged it for another one. $\endgroup$ – Will Barrows Dec 19 '18 at 0:49
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My Flashforge Adventurer 3 showed similar symptoms at the start of a print. I found that the z-axis was out of calibration, causing the print head to touch the platform, meaning that the filament could not extrude. The solution was to calibrate by slipping a piece of paper under the extruder and adjusting the z-offset until it was just touching. Worked fine after that. Hope this helps.

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I had an identical problem, flashforge provided me with a setup that helped (mostly going much slower) but I still needed high temperature and had a lot of failures.

Eventually I dismantled the extruder hot end and found that there is a tiny metal ferrule that secures the plastic tube the filament feeds through to get to the hot end. This had failed and been drawn into the tube. The high temperatures and slow speeds were basically just softening the PLA enough to squeeze past the blockage.

I cut the piece of metal out of the side of the plastic tube and reassembled without it.

The printer now works fine at high speeds and with any filament :)

I’ve not yet seen adverse any effect from removing this ferrule, I guess the extruder may fail eventually at which point at least I know I just need a new extruder.

There are four plastic clips you need to push in with a screwdriver if you want to try this, I was able to open it up without causing any damage as the clips are quite strong.

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  • $\begingroup$ Hi and welcome! $\endgroup$ – Davo Sep 10 '19 at 14:22
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for that information. Since I posted the original question, my printer developed more problems. The plastic tube was no longer being held in the collet. And of course, the thumping ('clicking' if you will) and blockages. Now I see the ferrule had failed on mine too, and probably had been dragged into the tube. $\endgroup$ – Will Barrows Sep 11 '19 at 20:01
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I had a lot of thumps lately after I moved my printer location.

Turns out my printer wasn't level and the extruder was pushing harder (further down) on different places, causing thumps. This really shows because the calibration is only in 1 spot.

I used some printer paper and a bubble level then recalibrated. Not a single thump since.

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    $\begingroup$ Note that bubble level says nothing, it is all about levelling the bed with respect to the X-axis. But indeed, an inconsistent bed shape and a nozzle close to the build plate can cause this. $\endgroup$ – 0scar Jan 24 at 22:48

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