2
$\begingroup$

I have a few issues with the blue tape, which I'm trying out for the first time.

The tape seems to warp, bubble and lift from the aluminum plate when it heats and cools and during printing. I put some clips on it, but not sure if this is standard.

It also seems the print is lifting off the tape itself (bottom left corner). I applied some magigoo glue to it. Maybe I shouldn't have done that.

I feel like this print isn't going to make it...

Print and tape adhesion problems

I'm printing with a Monoprice Select V2, with AmazonBasics ABS with 100 °C bed and 250 °C extruder temperature, at 15 mm/s initial layer speed and 60 mm/s print speed sliced with Ultimaker Cura.

$\endgroup$
3
$\begingroup$

The tape probably would stick better to the Aluminum bed than the BuildTak clone sheet you have as it would have had more surface area to bond to.

What I found that works best is to print on the bare aluminum bed using a PVA based spray, this can be hairspray or a specific 3D printer product like 3DLAC, or just glue stick. I ditched tape after day one (for reasons you mention) and solely print on aluminium or on glass without a problem, sometimes it sticks too well and the bed needs to cool down to room temperature before I can remove the print. This has been described as an answer to: Should you use hairspray on a metal bed 3D printer? .

Removing the BuildTak clone sheet may be quite laborious if a very sticky adhesive is used (it took me a long time and lots of solvents to remove the goo/glue from a PEI sheet I used once) it is better to try and print on the BuildTak sheet, maybe use PVA based (hair)spray or glue stick.

Furthermore, ABS is more difficult to print than PLA or PETG. Printing ABS is difficult because of the relative large shrinkage when the filament cools. It therefore requires careful heat management (no part cooling, no draft, enclosure, etc.). This filament needs a good surface to build on and requires brims, "mouse ears", adhesive spray or glue to get the first layer to stick and not curl up. Tape at temperatures of 100 °C will become soft and loose its power to stick. Kapton tape might work better.

| improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Ok, I didn't even realize I could print right on the aluminum bed instead of the Build-Tak sheet. I recently swapped out the Build-Tak sheet so I'm sure I can remove it again. A lot of glue was left over from the sheet though. What do you recommend removing that glue with? alcohol? $\endgroup$ – kane Jan 1 '19 at 2:11
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @kane I only had success with "thinner". But before you remove it try printing on the BuildTak first! You can even use hairspray or glue stick on that surface. $\endgroup$ – 0scar Jan 1 '19 at 14:10
2
$\begingroup$

Your printer has a build-tac clone surface. Blue tape does not stick well to that: you would get better results printing directly to the Build tape.

Painter's tape I use only on a flat surface: it works well directly on glass, aluminium or an unheated fiberglass surface.

| improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ thanks for your input. I will try on the build-tac surface first and then maybe directly on the aluminum plate after $\endgroup$ – kane Jan 1 '19 at 17:47
1
$\begingroup$

My Dad uses prittstick on the bed before the print and the bed keeps the prittstick just abbout the right temp for it to stick.

Me Gluing his print bed (No Need FOr tape)

| improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ PRetty much any brand gluestick will work this way. The only potential drawback is sometimes you have to scrape glue off the bottom of the finished part. $\endgroup$ – Carl Witthoft Jan 2 '19 at 13:55

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.