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I have a few issues with the blue tape, which I'm trying out for the first time.

The tape seems to warp, bubble and lift from the aluminum plate when it heats and cools and during printing. I put some clips on it, but not sure if this is standard.

It also seems the print is lifting off the tape itself (bottom left corner). I applied some magigoo glue to it. Maybe I shouldn't have done that.

I feel like this print isn't going to make it...

Print and tape adhesion problems

I'm printing with a Monoprice Select V2, with AmazonBasics ABS with 100 °C bed and 250 °C extruder temperature, at 15 mm/s initial layer speed and 60 mm/s print speed sliced with Ultimaker Cura.

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The tape probably would stick better to the Aluminum bed than the BuildTak clone sheet you have as it would have had more surface area to bond to.

What I found that works best is to print on the bare aluminum bed using a PVA based spray, this can be hairspray or a specific 3D printer product like 3DLAC, or just glue stick. I ditched tape after day one (for reasons you mention) and solely print on aluminium or on glass without a problem, sometimes it sticks too well and the bed needs to cool down to room temperature before I can remove the print. This has been described as an answer to: Should you use hairspray on a metal bed 3D printer? .

Removing the BuildTak clone sheet may be quite laborious if a very sticky adhesive is used (it took me a long time and lots of solvents to remove the goo/glue from a PEI sheet I used once) it is better to try and print on the BuildTak sheet, maybe use PVA based (hair)spray or glue stick.

Furthermore, ABS is more difficult to print than PLA or PETG. Printing ABS is difficult because of the relative large shrinkage when the filament cools. It therefore requires careful heat management (no part cooling, no draft, enclosure, etc.). This filament needs a good surface to build on and requires brims, "mouse ears", adhesive spray or glue to get the first layer to stick and not curl up. Tape at temperatures of 100 °C will become soft and loose its power to stick. Kapton tape might work better.

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  • $\begingroup$ Ok, I didn't even realize I could print right on the aluminum bed instead of the Build-Tak sheet. I recently swapped out the Build-Tak sheet so I'm sure I can remove it again. A lot of glue was left over from the sheet though. What do you recommend removing that glue with? alcohol? $\endgroup$
    – kane
    Jan 1, 2019 at 2:11
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    $\begingroup$ @kane I only had success with "thinner". But before you remove it try printing on the BuildTak first! You can even use hairspray or glue stick on that surface. $\endgroup$
    – 0scar
    Jan 1, 2019 at 14:10
  • $\begingroup$ Interesting to know, I always read that printing on aluminium is very difficult and it's much simpler to use glass instead (even without adhesives). $\endgroup$
    – FarO
    Feb 17 at 9:18
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Your printer has a build-tac clone surface. Blue tape does not stick well to that: you would get better results printing directly to the Build-Tac clone.

Painter's tape I use only on a flat surface: it works well directly on glass, aluminium or an unheated fiberglass surface, but you absolutely need to include its thickness in the leveling.

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  • $\begingroup$ thanks for your input. I will try on the build-tac surface first and then maybe directly on the aluminum plate after $\endgroup$
    – kane
    Jan 1, 2019 at 17:47
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My Dad uses prittstick on the bed before the print and the bed keeps the prittstick just abbout the right temp for it to stick.

Me Gluing his print bed (No Need FOr tape)

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  • $\begingroup$ PRetty much any brand gluestick will work this way. The only potential drawback is sometimes you have to scrape glue off the bottom of the finished part. $\endgroup$ Jan 2, 2019 at 13:55
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    $\begingroup$ @CarlWitthoft Most, if not all, glue from those sticks is water-soluble. Genuine Pritt stick glue has been biodegradeable since the year 2010, so it should be ok to wash it off under a running tap. $\endgroup$ Sep 11, 2020 at 18:46
  • $\begingroup$ @CarlWitthoft quick fix is to wash the finished part. All the gluestick I have is water soluble and it washes off easily with water and some finger rubbing. $\endgroup$
    – Criggie
    Feb 19 at 22:21
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Old thread, but I have a direct answer to the specific question asked. This is a technique I haven't seen documented elsewhere and works quite well for me.

  • Clean glass plate with an isopropyl alcohol swab - allow to air dry thoroughly.
  • Apply blue tape (two best known, big-name brands work best) to glass plate assuring no overlaps - slight gaps OK.
  • Put the plate on the heated bed, tape side down.
  • Turn bed heat on to 50 °C for about 3 minutes.
  • Quickly remove the plate and firmly roll the entire surface of the tape with a wallpaper seam roller while the tape adhesive is still warm.
  • Proceed normally, with or without a glue stick on the tape.
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While the other answers are correct, I would say that another correct answer is: you don't keep it from lifting up.

If it lifts up it means that the part is warping significantly, and blue tape has never been meant to deal with those.

Blue tape was introduced in the 3D printing when PLA took over ABS (like 8-10 years ago), therefore specifically because with PLA you didn't incur in the warping ABS had.

If the part is curling up, go for better solutions. You already have the PEI, so use that one.

If you print ABS with an open printer, which is totally possible, you should ditch the blue tape and check my other answer.

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The absolute best way to solve sticking problem is Overture build surface. I could not get anything to stick. Got a free build sheet when I bought some filament from them. What a difference, everything sticks now, just clean with alcohol between uses.

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  • $\begingroup$ Welcome to 3D Printing SE and thank you for your contribution. When you get a chance, please take the tour to understand how the site works and how it is different than others. $\endgroup$
    – agarza
    Sep 10, 2021 at 16:58

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