32

It probably won't be fair. Incidentally, I have a decent amount of experience with 3D printing. It depends heavily on the particular technology that you're using to do the 3D printing, but nearly all forms of printing aren't perfect--depending on the design you make (solid? honeycombed? hollow?), there will be slight, or not-so-slight variations across the ...


27

It looks like those clips are thin and need to bend pretty far to let the vial out. Try to make the clips thicker, but with a smaller clip to retain the vial so that it doesn't have to bend as much. This is what I'm thinking, in beautiful MS-PAINT form:


21

This is going to become a 3-step answer, as 3D Printing uses 3 different steps: Design, Slicing & Material choice before I elaborate alternate ways to some fair dice. Yet, we start with the material, as we need to know about it first. In this case it does impact everything from design to slicing and the print. Variant A: Printed perfect(?) Step 1: Know ...


17

Your question begins in an inappropriate format for StackExchange, but you've ended it with one more appropriate by asking if Blender would work. If you are willing to take the time to learn Blender, you are certain to discover that it will do as you require, and much much more. Your referenced model could be created using engineering-type design software ...


14

Designing a part for 3D printing often doesn't seem to have many special considerations, but I have learned the hard way, that there are some things to do differently. This is just a list of things to that one should keep in mind in addition to basic principles of design1 when designing parts, keeping the subsequently slicing the parts in mind too: Print ...


12

Short melting zone melts material in small amount which is suitable for thin layers with small nozzles. In opposite long melting zone can heat big amount of filament which is needed for fast printing and thick layers. short melting zone less amount of melted material thin layer heights quality printing with details give more precise volume control with ...


12

I did find only one 3d scanner which uses structured light. There is many projects using a laser diode. And these systems are completely opensource. Structured Light Structured Light 3D Scanning by kylemcdonald http://www.instructables.com/id/Structured-Light-3D-Scanning/?ALLSTEPS Laser diode Sardauscan http://www.instructables.com/id/Build-a-30-laser/?...


12

There's not a simple answer to this question, or if there is, it's "no". However the situation is a lot more complicated. When printer specs cite accuracy like this, they're usually basing the claim on the nominal size of the smallest movements on each axis by one "microstep" of the stepper motors. There's a great article on Hackaday explaining the how this ...


12

What you encounter there is a combination of Adhesion, Cohesion, and Capillary Force. Cohesion is what holds the water together. Adhesion is the force to retain water against a wall or hanging from a pen's end, it is proportional to the surface wetted. Capillary Force is the resulting effect where water moves up through a thin tube, it is anti-proportional ...


11

I agree with the previous assessments -- printing vertically for that part of the clip will definitely alleviate the layer adhesion being your weak point. You might also consider splitting that clip as a separate modular piece (which will clip/socket/bolt into the stand). Depending on implementation, this would give you the ability to Print that part ...


11

There are many different ways too approach this and the question may be too broad, but here's a stab at it... Here are a few different ways that I've made parts that connect in the past: Example 1: Utilize the elasticity of the plastic by creating a semi circle to fit around another object. When fitting the part to the other object, the "wings" will flex ...


10

A commonly seen method to provide spring action in a 3D printed model is to use a series of curved and straight segments. Some of the designs use the segment assembly in compression, aligned with the plane of the print, while others use the segment assembly for springiness perpendicular to the plane of the print. An example of the latter is a squishy turtle ...


9

One of the things I was told about was that many printers don't necessarily have that crazy precision of 0.05 mm (50 micron). Another person told me something different - he said most of those printers actually were capable of putting out 50 micron layer height. How is it really? Both things you've read are completely correct. Most printers are capable of ...


8

Considering that you wish to print the clip in the vertical orientation but without supports, I would suggest that you create a suitable taper of the clip from the bottom. The taper would provide necessary support-free support but may reduce the amount of bottle access one has to remove it from the clips. As such, you could also reduce the amount of the ...


8

3D printing provides a faster method for prototyping and have always been labeled as prototyping machines. Until recently, it has been rare to see 3D printers used for "mass manufacturing". Yes, most mass-produced products start the manufacturing process with a 3D model. 3D models can be created in many different applications such as Solidworks, AutoCAD, ...


8

I've printed a few dice, and thrown them ~100 times each to check -- they were very far off from fair. One reason, I think, is that the inner fill (and thus a lot of weight) is oriented a certain way. It might help to do solid-fill or no fill, but I haven't compared yet.


8

As Trish states, a print service would appear to be your best bet. Building a printer large enough may work out costing more than the print service, especially if it is only for one print of a proof of concept. Anecdotally, I visited a 3D Printing shop in Bangkok, JWH High tech Garden, that had a huge Delta printer that had, reputably, cost a million baht (~...


8

There are several factors playing together. For example orientation, printer & slicer settings and more. Reminder First of all, not all overhangs of greater than 45° need support. Many printers manage up to 60°, even 70° is not unheard of - with the right settings. Pretty much all printers manage tiny 90° overhangs. U-Bowls (open side up) Let's look at ...


7

Come on. Wider clips will just survive a bit longer. The real cause is the orientation (plane) of printing. Continues filament layer will always be more durable than few layers sticked together. So the question is why not to change printing plane? You can use better design which utilizes support without using "support material"


7

Here is a set of options you can get: print the object on multi color printer Unfortunately we got some limitations here (on the market). Printers have limited set of heads which are in fact printing in one color at a time. So we usually have 2 colors, there are also 4 color heads. If there are more then they are rare, expensive or rare and expensive. ...


7

Self intersecting meshes are considered dirty, yes. The reason you haven't had trouble before is probably that the software you were using was cleaning your mesh for you, behind the scenes. Generally speaking, these meshes can be cleaned without too much trouble by software like netfabb (https://www.netfabb.com/) which has a nice free version that I use for ...


7

I do not know about your project, but the size of the final object. Smaller prints glued together Just design smaller parts and glue them together. Take a look on this video, where Joel Telling glues OpenRC Formula parts. Hangprinter Interesting concept is Hangprinter where volume size depends on your room size. It's a RepRap so you have to build it ...


7

A resolution (sometimes called "accuracy" for marketing purposes) of 0.05 mm means that if you produce a bunch of 10 mm dice and a bunch of 10.05 mm dice, then the 10.05 mm ones will be statistically larger. Note that dice don't have to actually be anywhere near 10 mm, nor does a random die from the 10.05 mm pile have to be larger than a random die from the ...


7

Design a different connection to the shaft, however I don't know of any Use a shaft/flange coupler to be fastened to your shaft and to your printed part. Without knowing the length of the shaft, you could connect a flange/coupler to design this into your gear. This is a good solution if you have to transmit larger torques. See e.g. this pulley that ...


6

The right Google (or other) search should do the trick. I've provided 3D Printing services via 3D Hubs and MakeXYZ and some people do provide 3D scanning services. If you can't find 3D Scanning, you could try talking to a local machine shop. They might have the tools to be able to reverse-engineer the object, or know another place that can.


6

Typical FDM desktop 3D printers might struggle with this model as it requires you to either print large overhangs and use support structure (when printed laying down), or lacks a natural flat bottom surface to get good print adhesion (when printed upright). A couple of suggestions: Some FDM printers are great at printing support, and some even allow you to ...


6

I did a quick search using The Google with the terms "stencil font." There were too many results to list here and the first link I clicked on provided some seriously ugly fonts. Stencil fonts by definition will result in supported center pieces. Windows has a native font named, surprisingly enough, Stencil which does the same, but it's not quite as ...


6

You can't print without a 3D model first. There are various ways you can go about this (or pay someone to do the same for you, ignoring any IP issues). It is possible to generate a 3D model from a sequence of 2D photographs (there is even software which will allow you to do this freehand on a phone). Equipment exists which is specifically designed for this ...


6

Unfortunately, There's no easy way to go about this. The easiest solution is to model the part from scratch. A pair of (digital) calipers is an invaluable tool for doing that. Given that the part is rather small and (presumably) needs to fit with something, you need very precise measurements. 3D scanning or photogrammetry (reconstructing the models from 2D ...


6

Custom 3D printed dice are distinctly lower quality than the dice from a FLGS you see in 'standard' dice sets, and around the same quality of die as the cheaper plastic dice available online. It depends somewhat on your printer, but you can get very uniform results in terms of material density with the issues in die fairness being limited to problems with ...


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