6

It's common for modeling software to flip normals, causing what you describe. You said, I only care about the externally facing faces. But are you sure they are truly externally facing? Turn on normals in Blender and ensure that all the arrows/pointers are external. Another problem that can generate the results you're seeing are self-intersecting surfaces, ...


6

If you need a real shopping cart, please think about actual requirements. Carts are sturdy devices, build on very consistent frame, because they are meant to carry heavy loads. The built must be focused on good jonts and durable wheels, otherwise forces from load or streatching would quickly damage the construction. Some parts of frame are normally under ...


6

Install the "Chitu code" plugin from the Cura website, some companies use the Chitu board as their printer's CPU and Tronxy does that. Without the plugin, it won't show a preview of your design and also it won't print.


5

There are several problems at work here: Internal Geometry & unjoined parts Missing Surfaces Generally inverted surfaces: every surface is inside out! Fixing it! Step 1: add missing surfaces. Select the vertices around the hole that has no bottom surface and then pres F to create a surface. Use several steps, making roughly triangle surfaces. For ...


5

Rhino gives the following output for MeshRepair Mesh has 3 degenerate faces. (a face that's actually a line or a point) Mesh has 42 non manifold edges. (a line where 3 or more faces meet, possibly caused by degenerate faces) Mesh has 6 duplicate faces. (faces that share the same coordinates) Mesh has 148 naked edges (edges that have only one face) All of ...


4

Apparently the article in the question is out of date: Here's a family in France living in a 3D-printed house (95 sq.m. 1022 sq.ft.) since 2018: "The world's first family to live in a 3D-printed home" By Michael Cowan BBC's Victoria Derbyshire programme Published6 July 2018 https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-44709534 They essentially 3D-printed ...


4

If you have 3D software like Blender you can import your model and use the decimate modifier to lower the number of vertices and then re-export. Here is a link to how you can do this: Simplify Geometry with the Decimate Modifier in Blender 2.9.


4

Using an Ender 3 for high temperature materials is possible but you need to enclose it to be able to heat the air up to 100 °C. It's quite involved and it would be much better, if it's something you do seldomly, to have the parts printed professionally. Many thing start warping or breaking at 100 °C.


4

It's plastic. Nothing is difficult to remove, but it could be difficult to remove without damaging the functionality of visual quality of the part. If you want to be really devious, you could embed the serial number in an inaccessible cavity inside the print that's not visible without breaking it open. However, I wonder if it would make more sense to drop ...


4

There are a few possible ways you could go about this: If you have a multi-material printer, you may be able to print with both a transparent or translucent material for the internal structure of the print and an opaque material for the external parts of the print. PET(G) may be suitable for this purpose but is harder to print compared to standard PLA. You ...


3

Okay, so like suggested I put it into 3D Builder (A free Windows 3D modeling program). I imported it as an stl, then exported it as an stl and imported that stl into Cura. And lo and behold all problems were gone! If you are having a similar issue give that a try! The 3D Builder program and similar ones are designed to export for the sole purpose of 3D ...


3

Yes you can! To have stronger prints you would have to choose the correct direction of filament deposition paths/traces. This answer demonstrates changing the direction of the filament path in Ultimaker Cura slicer. To do this, it requires some tinkering of your model and choosing the correct slicer parameters (decimals aren't allowed in changing the ...


3

I presume that what you are saying is that you only have a rasterized image file. For example a .PNG file, and that you don't have any kind of source file containing vectors. Since you're already a skilled artist from the looks of it, you're largely limited by the software that you have access to, or how much you're willing to spend on new software. Probably ...


3

Use the smallest nozzle possible to get better rounded edges on holes. Slow down the print speed to increase accuracy and prevent errors. Print it face down against the bed if possible to reduce support requirements for overhangs and increase hole quality. Clean the bed well, increase bed temperature, stick glue, enable brim, or add 'mouse ears' to prevent ...


2

PEEK (poly ether ether ketone) has a glass transition temperature of 145 ‎°C (293 °F). Melting temperature 345 ‎°C (653 °F) Nozzle temperature 370 - 410 ‎°C Heated bed 120 - 150 ‎°C Polycarbonate has a glass transition temperature of about 147 °C (297 °F) Polypropylene has a glass transition temperature is 215 °C Polymaker PolyMide CoPA (specialized Nylon)...


2

In traditional mold making, this would require a "sectional" mold -- one that breaks into mutiple pieces to free the legs, rather than just two halves. Sometimes you can use a non-planar mold break line to avoid this issue; look at the molds made for casting miniatures that aren't neatly arranged to see examples, but as you note, with one rear leg ...


2

Are there any simple solutions I can implement out there? A gasket made of rubber or other elastic or deformable material is probably the best option. Printing one or both of the parts using a deformable material like TPU might also work. Finally, if you don't need to open the unit during the experiment, you could use a sealant like silicone caulk might ...


2

I was wondering the other day why don't all three motors move at the same time? That is perfectly possible for most printers (with limitations, "3D Printing" with all steppers being used is called "non-planar" printing), but there are some major cons you need to deal with. First, there are not that many software suites that slice objects ...


2

Frame challenge: is it just 1D printing? Each G1 command moves linearly in a single one dimensional affine subspace of the build volume. What makes 3D printing 3D is that the resulting object produced is three dimensional. There are indeed a lot of advances to be made in FDM printing by not working only within constant-Z cross sections at a time, but these ...


2

For this specific application, it may be better to think in terms of a Lot Number for each batch instead of individual serial numbers. This will still let you trace back an item for where it was originally allocated, and greatly simplify your processing. Under this plan, you create the STL file for the basic part and before each printing batch open the base ...


1

It appears that your question is directed to solving the problem of converting your file of parameters to a 3D printable form. I'm far from an OpenSCAD wizard, but I suspect that your parameters file could be read into a properly coded OpenSCAD document to create the necessary STL to be printed. Your reference of I, J, K is better considered as X, Y, Z and ...


1

The way I get rid of voids, like your triangular shaped voids the slicing program interprets as fill area, is to increase the number of vertical/perimeter shells (the shells on the side).


1

If on even layers, the routing is in one direction and on odd layers, the routing is the opposite diagonal, you'll have a much weaker structure, as there will be no material after the crossing point. Addressing that aspect, one could consider that the design is implemented in such a way that the nozzle creates the odd layer continuously from one corner to ...


1

You have "elephant foot". Look at the left end of the grip section of the clip in your second image -- see how the thickness increases toward the top (which was the bottom, against the build surface, when printing)? There are a number of causes for this; in your case, it continues for several layers, so the basic solutions (reducing first layer ...


1

OnShape has a "Move Face" tool that can do exactly this: select the relevant faces to move, and then choose "offset" as the "Move Type". You can do all your offsets at once, but because I'm often selecting a lot of faces, I find it easiest to create one offset per part, and hide the other parts to be able to drag to select ...


1

The Z axis moves between each layer so you are indeed printing in the 3rd dimension. There are some techniques that move all three axis at the same time.


1

Reading between the lines on other forums, I found that the GCAL renderer will render a malformed object, but it will fail when a binary operator, such as union or intersection, is applied to that object. There was a discussion about degenerate points (two points in a polygon list that were the (nearly) the same values. I had this situation, but fixing it ...


1

Regarding the second question: "Can I get 3D model of Mario and send that to a 3D printer?" meaning successful print, the answer depends on the model and the printer. Basically you can send any model to print, but each technology has its limitations of quality, size, physics. For figurines, resin printers (SLA or DLP technologies) seem best choice. ...


1

Yes. You can import it into Blender, but it will need "bones" and "armature" if you want it to move at all. In Blender, you can manually add armature and "Rig" it, if you want animations. You can probably convert whatever file type the 3D model is (probably STL) to fbx with Blender For animating, start with a super basic 2-...


1

People like PLA for dimensional accuracy. It's disadvantage is it becomes brittle, which can be an issue especially with thin prints if the application tends to bend it (applying force). Working with settings and with a 0.4 mm nozzle, typical for most printers using PLA, you can print walls as thin as 1 mm, but strength may be an issue. To prevent warping, ...


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