6

Install the "Chitu code" plugin from the Cura website, some companies use the Chitu board as their printer's CPU and Tronxy does that. Without the plugin, it won't show a preview of your design and also it won't print.


4

The cause of the meshing is under-extrusion. When under-extrusion happens, several problems can cause this. E.g. heat creep (probably not the issue here because heat creep is usually not recoverable, but not unimaginable since this is an enclosed printer, you could try printing at a lower temperature and look into less aggressive retraction settings), or an ...


4

There are a few possible ways you could go about this: If you have a multi-material printer, you may be able to print with both a transparent or translucent material for the internal structure of the print and an opaque material for the external parts of the print. PET(G) may be suitable for this purpose but is harder to print compared to standard PLA. You ...


4

Yes, printing a flat strand structure and then shaping it using heat to form hair is something people already do, for example with the Hairy Lion model.


3

It takes at least a few cm of extrusion to purge the old color before switching to a new one due to mixing in the melt zone, and possibly much more depending on the particular pigments. If the old color is something bright like red and the new one is white or something close, it can even take many tens of cm before you get a clean new color. Multi-color ...


3

If you have 3D software like Blender you can import your model and use the decimate modifier to lower the number of vertices and then re-export. Here is a link to how you can do this: Simplify Geometry with the Decimate Modifier in Blender 2.9.


3

While better fitted to our friends at law.SE, the general gist is: No. Art is protected by copyright, and any adaption (derivative work) requires the OK from the right holders per se. Only 70-75 years after the death of the author (or publication for company works), a work enters the public domain and the copyright expires. There are some exceptions (fair ...


3

From the excellent Thingiverse link, Customizable QR Keyring or Tag by OutwardB - which was provided in the (now deleted) link-only answer: Create the QR code Go to QRCode Monkey Only change the Content settings DO NOT change the color, logo or design settings Click Create QR Code Click Download PNG and wait for the file to download Convert to SVG Go ...


2

I actually found it easier to export my model as a single STL file, and then to open up 3D builder. It has a tool that let's you create a flat plane, and then slice a model into pieces using it. So long as you have a large enough surface area to glue, it shouldn't be a problem. I tried using booleans and the peg\hole method in Blender, but it simply wasn't ...


2

The value you see is the cumulative extrusion, in other words the E value in consecutive G-code commands reflect a position of the filament since you started that print. It is normal that it continuously increases in "absolute" mode. You should see, at the beginning of the G-code, also a M82 or G90 command, which means "absolute extrusion"...


2

Instead of using FreeCAD, I would import the mesh data into a vertex-based 3D modeling software, such as blender. After stitching the model in any areas where you still have gaps, you remove any vertex belonging to areas you do not want to use for the mask. This leaves you with pretty much a skin-tight base for your mask. Select all the remaining surfaces ...


2

This is more off-topic as an answer, but serves as a possible solution. Replacementlaptopkeys.com is a resource that appears to have keycaps for the model you've noted. https://www.replacementlaptopkeys.com/asus-zenbook-ux31a-db71-laptop-keys-replacement-dark-brown-black/ At seven dollars a key, it's going to be less expensive than 3D printing to accomplish ...


2

You can't print a LEGOTM Brick, because you are not Lego System A/S. The best you can do is print a brick that is compatible with LEGOTM bricks. Also note that Lego Systems A/S has more than 600 US design patents, which might interfere with the legality of manufacturing bricks in the US. The original bricks are made from ABS and made with a very tight ...


2

As @Gunslinger suggested, I would also recommend Blender for these tasks. Blender comes with the Add-on "MeasureIt", which has to be activated manually in Edit ► Preferences ► Add-ons ► Official/Community ► search for MeasureIt, check the checkbox: Import your STL file via File ► Import ► STL ► ... Select your object and hit TAB to enter Edit Mode ...


2

For stuff like this, OpenSCAD is your friend. There are several different approaches you could take: Generate an image file with grayscale color representing the height of the function on an XY grid, and use the surface feature to import it as a heightmap. Write the function as a mathematical expression in OpenSCAD language, and write a module to generate ...


1

That looks horribly familiar; I call it meshing. It's underextrusion, which can be caused by lots of things. I cleaned, then replaced the hot end, Bowden tube, and both couplers trying to solve the problem, but then the Z axis was binding. Tried a couple things for that, what seems to have worked was loosening a couple of screws flanking the Z screw. ...


1

Yes and no. It is sufficient for making a 3D model, but not in the way you want. Basically, you cannot turn a 2D image into a 3D model automatically, so you will have to do it manually. The image you have can be used as a reference image, and you will have to use some artistic freedom when creating the backside. It is basically the digital version of ...


1

In short, no. A 2D image has insufficient information to determine a 3D form. If you want to do this yourself, what you could do is start with the 2D outline in a program like Blender (as 0scar mentioned in a comment), extrude it to make a thin "cardboard cutout", then begin shaping it into three dimensions from there. Imagine it like cutting a ...


1

If you put the object directly on the bed, the lowest part of the object will be cured as the bottom layer. And yes, you can sand it away depending on the shape of the object. For such large objects, you can also use a feature called Double Exposure, it is available on few slicers and easier to deal with.


1

Meshmixer (free, multi-platform) supports and imports .3MF file format. There's something amiss with the file named Macro Keyboard RC Ver2.1 Top MiniCutout. It appears that the object is created from two improperly overlapped objects that have been merged. The result is a hole that isn't quite a hole: The other files have holes that appear to be normal. ...


1

Cura will import a picture and use it as a heightmap to build a 3d object. There are a few options available when importing : You can even export back the data as STL if you need to process the mesh. Here is the mesh exported in STL, opened in SideFX Houdini:


1

The OpenSCAD surface function will do this. You can feed it a greyscale image or a textfile containing a matrix. Documentation and examples can be found at https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/OpenSCAD_User_Manual/Other_Language_Features#Surface OpenSCAD is a cross platform free open source cad package.


1

You're better off if you can get the key from Fred's link. I was impressed by the detail of a 3D-printed battery cover for electronic calipers, but I'm sure it took much work to get it right. Also, ebay has keyboards for your model.


1

I think that your bed is too hot because the bubbling is only on the bottom layer, if it was through out the entire print, I would say that it is your nozzle temp and you should do a temp tower, but because that isn't the case try lowering your bed temp


1

It depends on the software you're using, but here is an example with TinkerCad. Step 1: Import your 3D model (imagine that the ball is a head): Step 2: Change its type from "Solid" to "Hole" Step 3: Create a "Solid" box around your imported model. Here is the inverted Solid/Hole version: Here is the Solid version with the ...


1

Anyone know any filaments or methods to have an immediate color change There is a solution (or multiple) where you can have multi color filament without a gradual transition from one to the other color (seen from the filament side, not the extrusion/nozzle side), i.e. immediate color change. This requires an additional piece of equipment to do this ...


1

Reading between the lines on other forums, I found that the GCAL renderer will render a malformed object, but it will fail when a binary operator, such as union or intersection, is applied to that object. There was a discussion about degenerate points (two points in a polygon list that were the (nearly) the same values. I had this situation, but fixing it ...


1

Regarding the second question: "Can I get 3D model of Mario and send that to a 3D printer?" meaning successful print, the answer depends on the model and the printer. Basically you can send any model to print, but each technology has its limitations of quality, size, physics. For figurines, resin printers (SLA or DLP technologies) seem best choice. ...


1

Yes. You can import it into Blender, but it will need "bones" and "armature" if you want it to move at all. In Blender, you can manually add armature and "Rig" it, if you want animations. You can probably convert whatever file type the 3D model is (probably STL) to fbx with Blender For animating, start with a super basic 2-...


1

Orienting items Orienting items on the build plate should consider: overhangs - many hangning fragments will need additional support to be printed (cost of time and material, risk of failure); gravity and colling process will affect loose/hanging plastic in this or that way layered structure - parts will be stronger in X-Y directions, and weaker in Z ...


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