Hot answers tagged

28

There are a few options. Machines are available which grind the used plastic into fine pieces, melt it down, and extrude it as filament to be reused. Filabot is perhaps the most well known. Depending on where you live the local recycling programs may accept PLA or ABS. They will then shred it and melt it down for reuse. PLA is bio-degradable so you can put ...


28

Paraphrasing this site. Feel free to add suggestions in the form of comments and I will try to incorporate them. Summary ABS: Stronger, machinable, more flexible, and more temperature resistant than PLA. Typically printed on a heated bed. Warping is a common problem when printing ABS. PLA: Wider range of filaments available, easier and in some cases faster ...


18

There are many different approaches to solving this issue and most of the answers already are spot-on. However, the fundamental reason for the "warping" is incorrect and inconsistent temperature across the material. If there is too much fluctuation in the temperature across the object in this heated state can result in warping. The reason you see this ...


18

This is not a good idea. Both filaments have different melting points, that of ABS being much higher than that of PLA. To melt the ABS you have to heat the plastic to the point where the PLA starts to degrade.


16

The "obvious" answer is re-grinding the prints and making more filament. Unfortunately, this isn't yet a very economical or simple operation. A decent filament extruder capable of holding acceptable diameter tolerances is around $1000, and even then they can be pretty fidgety to operate. You have to have a LOT of volume throughput in your filament extruder ...


15

It makes a difference where I live, and I'm not in a particularly humid climate (California). When printing with wet filament, you'll sometimes hear it popping and see steam coming out of the extruder (it's usually only this extreme with nylon). With most other filaments, when they're wet, the extruded filament will have small bubbles in it and the surface ...


14

I have a bunch of solutions to this problem but I'm always looking for additional ideas. I usually start by slicing as much as possible off with a hobby knife. The more than can be removed before sanding the better. For big prints I like big generic sandpaper sheets from the hardware store. Starting with the highest grit and moving down. Make sure you're ...


11

There are a few main safety precautions you should consider. Make sure the area is well-ventilated. Acetone is flammable. A buildup of acetone gas could quickly get concentrated, meaning that a single spark could lead to disaster. Using a fan is good; angle it towards an open window. This is also to prevent exposure to acetone because of its toxicity. Be ...


11

I found much the same question at Does PLA outgas? An answer there pointed to a NASA outgassing database, Outgassing Data for Selecting Spacecraft Materials, and says that: ABS (unknown supplier), MakerGeeks PET and Makerbot PLA have been measured and are listed in the NASA database. Poster there recommended PLA for lower outgassing, and clear PLA ...


10

Most common problem with corners is to low temperature of heated bed. Set the heated bed temperature to 110°. If this will not help then try to set brim in your slicer. The problem can be cause by other issues. You can find additional tips in following Troubleshooting Guides: overheating (simplify3d: Print Quality Troubleshooting Guide) differential ...


10

Almost all of the FDM materials outgas even at normal atmospheric pressure, and, in fact, most plastics outgas. Further, FDM and many other printing processes do not guarantee no internal voids - meaning that putting a 3D printed object into a vacuum may result in breakage, cracking, and possible explosion hazards. For this reason I would focus only on SLA,...


10

The thinnest wall your printer can print is determined by its nozzle size, and will be a little thicker than that nozzle size. A great challenge when dealing with thin, hollow cylinders is that the cross-section has very little surface area and it can delaminate easily, especially if the tube is long. You could try printing the tube with a very thick ...


9

It will be very difficult to find a recycling facility that will accept your 3D prints, because they're mainly set up to handle packaging material (which constitutes the vast majority of plastic waste) such as bottles. If you sent your 3D prints to your municipal recycling programme they would at best sort it out from the packaging material and incinerate it,...


9

You can not tell this by looking at the STL file alone, because how much material will be used depends on the print settings (obviously, printing at 100% infill will consume much more material than 10%). The best way to check the material usage is to load the model into a slicer and slice it using your preferred settings. Most slicers will report the ...


9

@Ecnerwal is right: that noise you hear is the extruder not being able to push the filament, and the stepper can't push any harder. When the extruder tries to push harder than it can, it gives up, and the "spring" tension it created in the filament forces it to go backwards a tiny bit. Then it tries again. Possible causes/fixes: Temperature too low -- this ...


8

Humidity may be the problem. Humidity tends to degrade filament, making it weaker. If you leave a coil of filament out, over time it will be exposed to humidity. I have yet to hear of this happening over a short period of time - the real threat comes if you leave it out for weeks or months - but it can happen nonetheless. Contamination with other materials ...


8

Adding a manually added brim with a larger bulk at the corner extremities that you can cut off after printing should help. My larger prints come off the printer looking like tents with concrete weights tied to their corners. The 'weights' are attached to the print by very short a 2-3 layer (depending on print size) brim-like strip that makes them easy to ...


7

The problem is that it's almost impossible to answer the PLA/ABS question just by looking at the material characteristics as it is so dependent on the application and even the specific object you're printing. The decision guide in this infographic covers the following points that usually should be involved when deciding between ABS and PLA: Ventilation - I ...


7

This is a common problem with ABS. You might prevent it by enclosing the printer inside a box/chamber - that will create a warmer environment and the extruded material will cool down more slowly, hence not creating such a tension. Other option is to use PLA instead if possible, the problem is not so significant with PLA.


7

I use normal wet/dry sandpaper and it works just fine. If I remember correctly, I usually start with 220 and then work my way up to 400, 600, and 800. There are also foam or rubber sanding pads available that work really well when you're sanding something organically shaped. The grits you start and finish with will depend on how rough your surface is.


7

I use nail files. They're easy to get, cheap and have different grits on either side. You can lay them flat or hold them in your hand and they have some stability making it fairly easy to sand something that is or should become flat. Plus, you can fix any nails you damage while removing support structures.


7

Cool environmental conditions are the single biggest contributor to ABS delamination. Delamination or edge/corner cracking is caused by warping stresses when the first layer adhesion is stronger than the interlayer bonding. Or it happens when the heated build plate allows a strong non-warping foundation to be built until the print is too tall to be ...


7

I am an official Wanhao Distributor By experience I can recommend you to print with this settings: Extruder 230 °C Heated Bed 65 °C Have a glass surface Use hairspray over the glass Continue to enclose the printer or at least put it where there is almost no wind Print at 45 mm/s Note that this settings vary a lot depending on humidity and other factors ...


7

If it's one-time-use, both ABS and PLA are perfectly safe for use as a cookie cutter. The "food safety" of 3D printed parts is fairly controversial. In fact, whether any particular material is approved by regulators (such as the US FDA) for food contact is much more complex than most people realize. Materials can be accepted for some uses and not others. ...


7

A couple things to consider: Ensure that your build plate is flat and level. An un-parallel HBP could result in the object "welding" to the raft. Turn down your nozzle temperature. It is likely that the material is hotter than it needs as it is extruding. This results in a slower "cool-down rate". So, if it takes longer for the filament to cool between the ...


7

I've had great success printing with HIPS (high-impact polystyrene) as a support for both PLA and ABS. Most sites recommend it for use with ABS because the materials melt at similar temperatures and work best with heated beds, but I've had good luck using it as a support material with PLA on a bed at 60°C. It doesn't stick as well to PLA as it does to ABS, ...


7

There is no requirement for an enclosure when printing ABS. Like many things in FDM, there are improvements to be made, but there is a scale of what is possible. A heated bed is much more necessary (for similar reasons, the thermal expansion is significant and without a heated bed you have very high risk of warping). An enclosure is important for high ...


6

If you're more interested in the recycling and reuse aspect than the re-print aspect, you could melt all the scrap filament onto a cookie sheet or into a bar (like in a bread ban). You could then manually work the material, or use a CNC machine to carve out your next thing. This Youtube video refers to HDPE, but the same concept will apply to other ...


6

In most cases, you should be fine with ABS or PLA out of an airtight container. If you're worried about it, throw a few desiccant packets where you store your filament. However, some specialty filaments should be stored in an airtight container. PVA is notorious for absorbing the ambient humidity around it. When it's heated, the water it has absorbed starts ...


6

Contrary to what the other answers suggest, the risk of fire is not that great. An acetone "explosion" is even more unlikely, since you need a ratio of 2.5%-12.8% acetone vapor to air for that: too much acetone (as would be the case inside of your smoothing vessel) and nothing happens, too little (as would be the case inside of a badly ventilated room) and ...


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