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I don't believe that slicing engines create any sort of solid model that would be useful for CAD simulation. When a slicing engine slices a 3D model, it's goal is to spit out the preferred machine paths in G-Code (of some kind). However, I've read a few articles, done some tests, and heard through the grape vine that anywhere between 10%-35% is good enough ...


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Since I am not able to comment on this question yet, I thought I would provide an answer in addition to the already helpful insight provided. If the question in general is regarding infill percentage, and the common follow-up regards part stiffness, then it should be explained that choosing infill percentage is much more than just part stiffness. Printing ...


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Anton, I parse the G-code and build a finite element model and a thermal transient event to simulate the printing of the part, followed by a structural simulation to determine the deformation and stress state in the resulting part. This part could then be further analyzed with external loads to determine mechanical characteristics. I use ANSYS software and ...


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Some tools like Cura or Repetier Host have slicers that analyses and tell you if it is ok to print or not. Both of them allow rotations.


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In Tymrak, B. M., M. Kreiger, and Joshua M. Pearce. "Mechanical properties of components fabricated with open-source 3-D printers under realistic environmental conditions." Materials & Design 58 (2014): 242-246., the authors suggest that one of the strongest factors influencing simple tensile strength of a 3D printed part was the ratio of its measured ...


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Check out Hypermesh Optistruct, which lets you perform topology optimization to identify the optimal distribution of material within any matrix in order to satisfy desired performance criteria. https://altairhyperworks.com/solution/Additive-Manufacturing Similarly Scott Hollister's work describes the procedure to design a porous scaffold to meet ...


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Rhino will let you create a custom lattice structure inside the solid object, this can in turn be used to create infill using grasshopper (an inbuilt scripting tool): create a standard cell size and apply the lattice, convert the whole thing to solid, reimport into inventor


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I could think of a way. But it might require a few softwares to get everything done. First get the CAD file. Import to magics (Materialise proprietary software) There is a function for structures, you can build your custom internal structure. So add trusses etc. Export stl. (There is one software which allows direct stl to step conversion, I think its ...


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