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6

Many 3d printer motherboards are based on Arduino/Atmega microcontroller and just add some stepper motor drivers, MOSFETs and such in a single board. That explains why you use the Arduino IDE to update or modify their firmware. Now why you would want to use an Arduino + an Arduino shield board like RAMPS? Well if you're not good at electronics, are happy ...


5

Many of the motors that look like stepper motors in laser printers are actually three-phase brush-less DC motors. These look like stepper motors, but are intended to be used differently, controlled differently, and serve a different function. Like stepper motors, they have a permanent magnet rotor surrounded by coils of wire. They typically are used in ...


4

Current versions of Arduino IDE Use the menu option in the Arduino IDE: Sketch ► Export Compiled Binary See post #6 from the thread How to get hex file from arduino files ?: Well, since it was bumped it's worth mentioning there is a new way to do this added in Arduino IDE 1.6.5: Sketch > Export Compiled Binary If you are doing this with an ...


4

One option would be to have your printer controlled by an Octoprint server. You would then use the Octoprint Api plugin to use your arduino to send commands to octoprint - and from there, your printer. Octoprint has a fairly fully-featured rest api that allows you to send arbitrary GCODE to your printer (see here). You would then hook up your buttons to ...


3

Movement of the steppers is controlled by the jerk and acceleration settings. Both are controlled/set in the Marlin configuration file. /** * Default Max Acceleration (change/s) change = mm/s * (Maximum start speed for accelerated moves) * Override with M201 * X, Y, Z, E0 [, E1[, E2[, E3[, E4]]]] */ #define ...


2

The video shows 6 in the wiring diagram, but missing one line between 1 and 5V. You can see all the pins used at this moment and a little better in this moment. The first is always the connector, the second the Arduino Uno side: 1 to 5V 2 to Ground (GND) 3 to 10 5 to 11 10 to 12 9 to 13 Note that the revision 3e of the genuine Arduino Uno demands to ...


2

This seems to be either a case of either belt slop or missed steps or it is a case of the accuracy of the limit switch. If the limit switch moves even a little into either direction, you have to account twice that as the maximum error. So the 4 mm error could come from 2 mm into either direction from the 0-position. However, there is a silver lining: ...


2

Okay thanks to @towe for helping me I figured it out. my Baud Rate was set to 115200 but my board is using the old bootloader so it needed to be 57600. I Changed my boards.txt file to that but the verbose console printed: Overriding Baud Rate : 115200 turns out you need to change it in the serial monitor as well (the little magnifying glass in the ...


2

A number of options exist, but keep in mind that cost will be a limiting factor. (Small sidenote: cost depends on persective, financial cost does not equal mental cost. The tradeoff between buy or make depends also on your willingness to persist when things don't work right away.) Before you start: make sure that your printer has enough space to accomodate ...


1

As towe said, it could be a dir pin ( can be checked by metering the dir connection), but in my experience this behavior has usually been a limit switch issue (as 0scar pointed out). Try seeing if you have a limit switch setting somewhere that expects normally closed (assuming no limit switches are connected). There is also another possibility that has to ...


1

This isn't really a 3D-printing issue as much as it is about Arduino, USB, and how serial connections over USB differ from a generic UART serial connection. For a UART-based serial connection, there are only two devices, and both devices are peers - either can send data to the other with no real restrictions as long as the speeds are set correctly. USB ...


1

This really sounds like there is a short somewhere on the RAMPS add-on board. It is advised to not use the RAMPS add-on shield to prevent damage to the Arduino or the shield. Personally, I would ditch this one and buy a new one. By the looks of the picture you are using a clone RAMPS, these are mass produced and the quality is not always the best (many ...


1

There isn't really a big advantage to one solution or the other. The approach of having separate boards means it is more modular and broken parts can be replaced more easily, but electronics don't break on their own: it is almost always user error. If you are even a tiny bit careful when assembling your electronics, you won't ever have anything break and the ...


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