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6

A very helpful page for troubleshooting common errors is: Print Quality Troubleshooting Guide - Lines on the Side of Print It seems like your problem is inconsistent extrusion or temperature variation. From the photo you posted I guess that you use a big diameter nozzle. Keep in mind that your extruder might not be well equipped to deliver such a large ...


4

I've now worked out the reason for the plastic 'running' on the second layer. It is because of the way that I prepared the G-Code file, using the option in Slic3r which lets you alter the layer height for certain layers in the print. The problem with this appears to be that there are other settings which are not altered at the same time for the thicker ...


4

ASA is Acrylonitrile styrene acrylate. According to Wikipedia: ASA can be solvent-welded, using e.g. cyclohexane, 1,2-dichloroethane, methylene chloride, or 2-butanone. Such solvents can also join ASA with ABS and SAN. Solutions of ASA in these solvents can also be used as adhesives. Staff, PDL (1997). Handbook of Plastics Joining: A Practical Guide. ...


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From Simplify3D - ASA: ASA can be smoothed using controlled exposure to acetone vapors (a process called “vapor smoothing”).


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According to MatterHackers, Simplify3D, and 3D Insider an enclosure is not necessary but highly recommended as ASA, like ABS, is susceptible to drafts and can warp. A heated bed is necessary (somewhere between 90-110 °C), and little-to-no cooling fan used. The enclosure helps ensure adhesion and a consistent temperature. ASA also has fumes and an enclosure ...


1

Can you tell by looking at the de-adhesion what isn't sticking? It may be that printing the ASA at higher temperature is melting the BVOH enough that it doesn't stick, being molten. If so, then it may be possible to print the first layer of ASA at a cooler temperature, slower if necessary to still succeed at extrusion, with fans blowing. Then, print the ...


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