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17

Your question begins in an inappropriate format for StackExchange, but you've ended it with one more appropriate by asking if Blender would work. If you are willing to take the time to learn Blender, you are certain to discover that it will do as you require, and much much more. Your referenced model could be created using engineering-type design software ...


17

I suggest Blender. It's not the simplest of tools but it is free and learning it will improve your 3D printing skills. :-) (I write this answer also for future viewers of this question so I start basic). Another answer can be found here, How do I measure a distance between two points? Import your STL file. Press the Home key to view everything. Select the ...


6

It is quite common for modelling operations to result in 'non manifold geometry', meaning that some of the faces intersect or are not perfectly joined. Although there is nothing obvious in your model, you can check in blender by going into edit mode, unselect all, selecting nodes, and 'select all by attribute/non manifold' Ctl-Alt-Shift-M (if I remember ...


5

3D printers cannot print in the air without a prior layer or a support structure supporting the new printed layer. For the picture showing the bottom of the fruit, the red area is the calculated area that requires support for printing, so please enable that in the slicer application. For the top picture please post a detail or a zoomed in part. It is ...


5

Judging from your second screenshot, I'd say that Cura does not like n-gons very much. An n-gon is any polygon with more than 4 sides. Most software tries to convert these polygons into triangles, with solutions that may not be what you want. Obviously, if you triangulate your surfaces manually this problem becomes moot. Go to Modifiers, add the ...


4

Here is what I suggest you try. If you have a file that you can view/edit in blender I would export it as both STL and OBJ formats. Then take those files and upload them to Netfabb (https://netfabb.azurewebsites.net/) and get a "repaired" file. Have the library try again with the repaired STL and OBJ files. If this doesn't work try to get the exact error ...


4

I recently purchased a 3d printer and have found that freecad suited me really well http://www.freecadweb.org/ and its open source. I believe its very similar to onshape in its a parametric modeller but runs locally rather that online. Using the Parts view i have made most of my models using basic shapes and boolen subtractions.


4

You are correct about the walls. Using a Solidify object modifier is probably your best bet. A low Thickness: value (0.1 is probably good) helps keep the walls thin but strong. You can monitor the thickness while you adjust the value from Wireframe view. Additionally, and this is probably the most important thing to know, your mesh must be clean. By clean, ...


4

I printed the thing for some layers to see what the printer actually does: There are clearly too many retractions and unretractions. This can be seen in advance by letting Slic3r show the retractions and unretractions. For the green "walls", it became clear that it prints them exactly onto the empty space, so in fact the seem to be floating. That made ...


4

You have modeled your bird. So far so good, but you likely only modeled a single surface and not a closed surface body. The crucial step was forgotten, as your pictures 1 and 2 show: you have designed a single surface for most of the object, not a body. To turn the bird into a printable object needs it not to be a single surface but a surface enclosing a ...


3

You are looking at overhangs in the design tool. What matters are overhangs when printing. When designing the object, the coordinate system is convenient for working with the object. Before slicing, the object can be rotated and repositioned for better printing. Only after is it positioned for printing can the actual overhangs and bridges determined. ...


3

Makerbot will accept obj files also. Is there an error while importing the obj file? Also you can see errors of your imported file in your makerbot It will be marked in black. Please make sure your object is a watertight mesh. As I have seen its easy to make a surface model in sketchup. A 3D Printer cannot print something in surface. You can also try ...


3

If you have any programming background at all, consider OpenScad. It is a functional type of programming language that lets you do a lot of things quite easily without art skills. OpenScad skills are useful for building customizable things on Thingiverse. Here is a place to start


3

after a lot of search, i used the autodesk Meshmixer to add thickness to the model. I used the blender only for modeling and didn't use the solidify modifier to add thickness to the model. Then in autodesk Meshmixer, using select→ edit → Extrude, i added thickness to the model (the new stl file is presented). It seems that the new model can be printed. ...


3

At the intersection of the top and bottom planes of the cross-piece and the cylinder, there are non-manifold edges. Meshmixer is able to identify this problem but cannot repair it. My slicer, Simplify3D also identifies the faults and prints a solid cylinder between the planes. Prusa Slicer 2 also creates a solid at that location. As you've indicated that ...


2

You can check out Tinkercad. It is an easy to use, online editor. Even though it is not as powerful as Blender or Rhino3d, for easy 3d models it is more than sufficient.


2

I'm no expert, but have done some research on this question and it seems to me that Fusion 360 is currently your best bet. It's designed to do exactly what you're planning, from start to finish. Design (Sculpting and precision modeling), Test (fitting/animation analysis), and Fabricate (CAM and 3D printing) all wrapped into one program that has a logical ...


2

I think Autodesk Meshmixer is the best, as you can easily make parts with boolean operations(if you're more of a cubic thinking guy) or drag-and-sculpt(if you're more of a freeform guy). (And thoses videos are old but still working). If you want to get better reflexes in CAD engineering, I think Solidworks is the best (but really expensive if you aren't an ...


2

We get this question a lot in the facebook groups I manage. The usual answers do not include blender as it has a stupid hard learning curve. That is overkill for what you are looking to do. Look into 123d from autodesk. Free if you do not make money. I find this one to be the easiest. http://www.123dapp.com/design Also there is Google sketchup, with SLT ...


2

Double-check that your model is solid (i.e. watertight). Holes in the mesh, or (as other's mentioned in the comments) or problems with thickness can cause those issues. You can use Netfabb's Cloud Services, or download the free version of their app. There are other model repair services, too.


2

Your question falls into two different categories, here at 3D Printing SE and there, at Blender SE. I would consider that your objective would best be solved using some form of parametric modeling, an aspect that is rarely embraced by Blender. Even though the limitations of Blender make life interesting for you, there may be a couple of useful features ...


2

As @Gunslinger suggested, I would also recommend Blender for these tasks. Blender comes with the Add-on "MeasureIt", which has to be activated manually in Edit ► Preferences ► Add-ons ► Official/Community ► search for MeasureIt, check the checkbox: Import your STL file via File ► Import ► STL ► ... Select your object and hit TAB to enter Edit Mode ...


2

I'm a regular user of Blender and the 3D Printing add-on to design and print stuff. It will always consider the bottom of your model as an overhang, and it should pose no problem when you send it to print. The add-on will say the bottom is an overhang because, in the virtuality of Blender, the object you're designing, like the cube in your picture, is ...


2

Not sure about Blender, but MeshMixer has a "Plane Cut" tool that would allow you to take the source STL file and cut off the parts you don't want. That might save you some pain. But if the final sliced gcode file works, don't worry too much.


2

Blender imports all STL files as if they are a single object. If you have multiple meshes in the object that you want to be separated, you can press tab to enter edit mode, select the parts that need to be separated, then hit P and separate by selected. If you want to print those pieces as one part you have to get rid of any internal faces. The easiest way ...


2

Overhangs that are substantially greater than 45° to the vertical generally require supports, and overhangs of 90° will definitely require supports, unless they are bridges (supported at both ends). Depending on how well you have your printer and filament "dialled in", it is possible to print overhangs up to 70° without supports. However, if your model is a ...


2

Try disabling the "Union Overlapping Volumes" option on Mesh Fixes section. Worked for me.


2

Don't modify the STL to separate the visors with cylinders. The rest of the part is unsupported, so this will give you lots of support structures or, if omitted, a gigant spaghetti print. Josef Prusa is already printing stacked visors on his print farm overnight. I would stack the models of a set of visors in my slicer and for each visor added after the ...


2

Instead of using FreeCAD, I would import the mesh data into a vertex-based 3D modeling software, such as blender. After stitching the model in any areas where you still have gaps, you remove any vertex belonging to areas you do not want to use for the mask. This leaves you with pretty much a skin-tight base for your mask. Select all the remaining surfaces ...


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