Hot answers tagged

9

You are probably right, I have a Tarantula as well, and this happened many times to me. The reason is mostly because the hotend fan gets too hot, stops working, then, the filament in the aluminium heat sink melts and sticks the filament inside the PTFE tube. Then, on the retraction, the PTFE is pulled into the gears just like on your picture. Also, the ...


9

Yes, you can increase retraction past E3D's max 2 mm recommendation to compensate for Bowden tube stretch and slop. The reason for the recommendation is that jams will occur with most all-metal hot ends if you pull molten filament up into the cold zone. Any molten filament that enters the cold zone rapidly cools and hardens and sticks to the walls, very ...


7

As pointed out by this article, you can try to: Increase your speed for travel moves Increase retraction length Place objects strategically during print 1. Calibrating travel speed When calibrating travel speed, you can work with: Maximum travel speed Acceleration Jerk Z-hop/lift * I found this acceleration calculator (by RepRap Central) and video (by ...


7

You may need to secure the pneumatic coupling in the closed position with a small plastic clip (which should be supplied with the hot end). You can print your own, providing that your printer will work for long enough (a paper clip might do the trick): Thingiverse: Bowden Tube Clip v3 Addendum: Some pneumatic couplers are sprung, so that you have to ...


7

It's okay to leave the filament in the hot end, as long as you let it cool down with the hot end cooling fan running. From comment: That's not an issue, you can simply leave it in the hot end. The only "end of print" clogs usually occur when leaving the hot end hot for a while - allowing the filament to drip out - and then retract the filament without ...


6

To fight heat creep, you must understand why this is happening. Heat creeps up the hotend assembly as a result of incorrect settings or hardware setup causing the filament to prematurely soften and swell. It is important to reduce the heat travelling upwards in the first place rather than fighting the result. Too high print temperatures are an obvious ...


6

The question seems to be built on a false premise, namely that the major extrude/retract errors in a Bowden design come from tube stretch. The PTFE tube is not significantly elastic, actually it is reasonably stiff so there is minimal scope for improvement here. A longer tube will contribute to degraded precision, but slack in the filament/tube gap is ...


5

As a user of an UM3E, which uses Bowden tubes and has TPU as an available material, I can tell you that the kinking issues can be alleviated or downright avoided. I've printed quite a few things with the Ultimaker-brand TPU 95, and never had problems with kinking in the tube. Ultimaker uses 2.85 mm filament, with Bowden tubes adapted for those and a rear ...


4

I just plugged the ends of tube and soaked it in real warm water for 5 minutes then stretched it out on a table. That helped then the hard part I spooling it up against the arch and soaked it again. This seem to work the best.


4

To my experience, there is absolutely no problem in increasing retraction in E3D assemblies up to at least 5 mm. Typical retraction distance for my Bowden system is 3.5 mm (ABS). Clogging may occur after a series of retracts when thermal break doesn't have enough time to cool itself down. To avoid clogging when there is a real need in long retracts ...


4

In addition to the already excellent answers above, I want to mention that maybe a change in hotend temperature (lower) can also help reducing ooze/stringing. That is, if not other parameters prevent that.


4

What you see on the outer surface is called "zits and blobs". These small imperfections you experience are "zits" (larger ones are referred to as blobs). As the extruder needs to start and stop as it moves around during a print, it is difficult to create a seamless joint, so the over-extruded filament represents the location where the extruder started (or ...


4

The short answer to identify what extruder type you have is the rotation of the extruder gear. CCW rotation to extrude = right-handed extruder Detailed explanation is below. In addition to the other answers, the right-handed designation comes from math and pysics convention that has become a well known mnemonic in engineering practice: or in its physics ...


4

This is an example of a right handed extruder setup: And this is an example of a left handed extruder setup: I believe that you can can choose whatever one you favor. With the right handed setup, you will be pushing down the red part with your right hand when inserting filament. With the left handed setup, you will be doing the same thing but then with ...


3

when thinking about righ-handed extruder or left-handed extruder it's good to know that there is no magic or any other science rule behind this naming convention. it's just an arbitrary explanation which can be unfortunately misleading. in fact there is visual explanation of this left / right handed name and it doesn't have anything to any "the right handed ...


3

It usually doesn't matter whether you get a right-handed or left-handed one. The reason the two different variations exist is because some people use a dual extruder setup. If you have two extruders it is convenient to have them be mirror images of each other (as this makes them easier to install in use with the filament release lever pointing out to the ...


3

To also validate the first answer, I have been printing with TPU95A for a number of years and it has been one of the most reliable materials to use. The strength of the product alongside the flex makes it a test and production based outcome with fewer issues. My printer for the most part of this experience was the Ultimaker 2+ that has a similar set up to ...


3

I resorted to google to find a candidate image which might be similar to your hotend. Now, it is safe to assume that a like-for-like replacement will not improve matters significantly. It is also a good assumption that the performance gap which you need to close is small. Presumably you know how much time you need to wait for the creep to manifest itself so ...


3

As a short-term fix, grab a twist drill bit that is on the order of 1.5 mm diameter (assuming a 1.75 mm tube). Using a hand drill, slowly and gently drill out the clogged filament. Obviously you want to try to avoid scarring the teflon lining, so better to use the thinnest drill that will work. With a little training and a little luck, you'll get the ...


3

If you are able to force the filament from the interior of the bowden tube without causing damage to the tube, you will be able to determine the cause of the clog. My bowden tube clogged recently, but it was because I left the system idle with old filament inside. The filament broke from brittleness and the edge of the broken pieces managed to wedge against ...


3

If an extra few degrees of heating the hot end does not work, you could try to increase the amount of Ampere through the steppers. Increasing the current will increase the torque of the stepper. The question is what your current Vref of your extruder stepper driver is. To get a maximum current of 1 Ampere you require a Vref of 0.4 V if you have genuine ...


3

Even though you may have acceptable extrusion, any clicking from that area of your printer is likely to be a missed step on the extruder motor. This may be insignificant with respect to print quality, but as you suggest, it is an irritation. If you are confident that your nozzle is clean of debris (which is likely), you could consider to raise the nozzle ...


3

The slipping does result in lost retraction distance. It does not result in underextrusion, lost material (except possibly via having insufficient retraction after the reduction), or anything like that. If your retraction is set to 6 mm, but the bowden pulls 2 mm into the coupler when you retract, those first 2 mm of filament motion do not pull the filament ...


3

A Bowden tube is by design fairly small diameter to match the filament within, constraining the forces applied by the remote extruder mechanism. As you've noted, friction is a consideration. For your application, you would not have to have such a tightly constrained diameter. You could use a Bowden tube for 2.85 mm filament, if your direct drive extruder is ...


2

A colleague of me puts spring steel wires in the tubes and leaves the tubes on the central heating for a certain amount of time (probably hotter than 60 °C).


2

You could use a hairdryer to introduce a spot-bend where you need it.


2

One thing or another limits (controls) the flow form the nozzle. in ideal operating conditions, the molten/softened plastic is kept in a small pool in the nozzle, without high pressure, and responsive to pressure by flowing from the nozzle. The plastic must be viscous and self-adhering enough that gravity and residual pressure on the melt will not be ...


2

The most common setup is 1.75 mm filament inside PTFE tube with 2 mm internal diameter and 4 mm outside diameter. The 4 mm outside diameter goes inside pneumatic push in 4 mm tube connector with 1/8 BSP thread that goes somewhere like E3D extruder. It is very arguable if PTFE tube not significantly elastic. Apart from elasticity ...


2

If it's just the pressure fitting on the brass coupler that shifts in/out, or the PTFE tube shifting slightly in/out but remaining in the coupler, that shouldn't be a problem unless it's so loose it can come out entirely. The blue clips which should have come with the printer are intended to stop this motion or at least provide enough pressure to prevent it ...


2

If the tube is PTFE, the tube is not likely to be melting unless your hotend temperature is out of control. You would probably notice the PLA cooking. So, perhaps they aren't PTFE, or perhaps it is wear. If it wasn't PTFE, you should be able to tell by the texture, slipperiness, and bending force. The four thinned faces look like they would correspond to ...


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