14

Without going into too much detail, since this is a very exhaustive topic, I'll write some pro's of each down from the top of my head: Cartesian XZ hotend, Y bed (eg. Prusa Mendel): easy to build (relatively) easy to maintain easy to modify understandable kinematics with the right frame, no x-y-z orthogonality (90 degree angles) needs to be adjusted ...


14

Your nozzle is clearly too far from the bed. The plastic should be squashed down slightly. Some firmwares have an option where you can adjust the height of the nozzle "live" during the first layer, in Marlin this is called "babystepping". This can be very useful because you can get the height correct without having to mess with the physical leveling of the ...


12

When centered in the slicer correctly, without offsets defined in the slicer, the printer is most probably incorrectly configured! Luckily you can do something about that! Basically, you will have to calibrate the printer for a new center. Printer origin? First of all, the firmware determines where your origin of the printer is. This implies that you need to ...


10

While the "best" method is probably unanswerable since it would be based on very specific requirements and subject to change as soon as a better method were devised, here are some feasible methods to auto-eject 3d printed parts. Some of these are methods that I've considered for my personal use, others have been mentioned by others and added for helpful ...


10

Prints could end up on tray for couple of reasons. Vacuum force on early layers - Usually you should lose pieces on the center of platform Put holes or channels on platform Very slow speed on early layers Use smaller platform Use tilt mechanism Use larger support structures Use stickier platform - Anodized aluminum is specially good Non-aligned platform ...


8

Eureka! All of the other answers and suggestions on this post were all very helpful, and would likely be the right answers 90+% of the time, but they didn't give me any relief. I spent a bunch of time watching YouTube videos about 3D printing and I started to notice a difference in size of the lines of plastic being laid down on the build plate. In the ...


7

Picture frame glass (generally float glass) will work well enough, but count on it eventually cracking/getting chipped. It's always very flat (due to the way the production process works). Taking it up to 100-110C for printing ABS should not be a problem, but you'll want to avoid sharp changes in temperature, and should be careful that your prints don't ...


6

Typically, people cool down their build plates to get parts to release, rather than heat them up. That said, I doubt a hair drier will get hot enough to do any damage to the build plate. You could try it with no harm done.


6

The answer is "No" you don't need a heated bed for PLA but it does make the base layer a little easier to lay down and also helps with print removal post print. PLA is a very easy filament to work with and the majority of PLA printers don't come with heated beds and suggest blue tape and/or elmers glue. You may find that if you are purchasing very cheap/...


6

Just move the Z-endstop up a little higher, also make sure the bed leveling screws are not completely screwed in. So: Move the head of the printer up. Move up the Z-endstop so that the nozzle is a little higher than the build platform. Home the printer. Disable the stepper motors and move the head over the bed to a certain position (e.g. a corner without ...


5

Obviously being in a rush can limit your options, but here are a few thoughts: Quick solutions: Blue painters tape (as Carl mentioned) will work directly on your heated bed...assuming it's a flat piece of aluminum with the heating element under it. Your surface does need to be flat. Acrylic plate will work but is best with no heat, or low heat. PLA ...


5

The problem you are experiencing is because the position where the y endstop is triggered does not correspond to y = 0, but perhaps corresponds to y = 15 (replace 15 by the offset you're seeing). You can perhaps solve this by adjusting the endstop to trigger at the correct point, but you can also adjust this behavior in software: In your start G-code, after ...


5

Depends on the glue and on your tolerance for messy undersides on your prints. It's fairly common for some of the glue to come off with the print. Or you may have marks from scrapers or rafts. Do you want to touch up that spot and have some artifacts on the bottom of the next print, or clean and redo the bed to get everything flat? Gluestick is pretty easy ...


5

Your photo has shadows which seem to suggest that your tape layer has some wrinkles. That won't help. Try removing that tape and laying down the fabulous blue painter's tape. If you read any dedicated forum for plastic extruder printers, you'll find plenty of claims that X or Y is the best way to guarantee adhesion. Some folks swear by glass+gluestick,...


5

You could cool down the heated bed (with e.g. [M109][1] R28) and cool down the hotend (with e.g. [M190][1] R40). This will usually release the print from the plate, perform the actions to move the head (e.g. go to the largest X, Y position G1 X{max} Y{max}, move down G1 Z10 to then move to minimum X, Y G1 X0 Y0 position such that it sweeps the print to the ...


5

Basically, your setup is the following: The overhang of the bed, assuming the bearings are in the center, equals (300-105)/2 = 97.5 mm on each side. So the distance from the leftmost bearing face (when bed is at y = 0 mm) to the center of the Y rods assembly equals 300 - 97.5 = 202.5 mm. Knowing this distance for the other side of the center to the right ...


5

Too Hot If you're printing too hot (with any filament, not just PLA) you're going to see stringing and blobs/oozing because the material is getting runny and exiting the nozzle in an uncontrolled manner. Because it's uncontrolled, you will also likely see artifacts showing up in your prints. You might also see your filament burning. Instead of coming out of ...


5

I use kapton tape to fixate the glass plates to the heated beds on two of my printers, one a Prusa i3 clone, the other a CoreXY. The tape is able to withstand higher temperatures, and is very thin, so it doesn't have the drawbacks of limiting the print area or high chance the nozzle hitting the clips.


4

I would do as fred_dot_u initially suggested, by increasing the bed temp (or using a hair dryer) to heat the BuildTak. Then, use a small fan to quickly cool the platform (or at least quicker than room temperature). An ice pack on the build plate/part could also work. This drastic fluctuation between the build platform (or BuildTak) and the part should make ...


4

What I tried and worked is to apply water based normal Glue-stick on the tray and with few drops of water distribute it evenly across the tray surface, let it dry and then you are good to go!


4

I've been struggling to work out what is wrong with the process where you claim to be leveling the bed OK (and the print is starting in mid air). Now I remember I had exactly the same problem with my first prints. I think you are leveling OK, but getting some binding in the Z-axis. As the head jumps to start printing, it goes up, then down (but not as far ...


4

I also had issues with the first layer sticking to the build plate and I did not want to sand the plate. As most people will mention you need to make sure that your plate is perfectly level and the z height is right (lots of friction on the paper). You also need the correct exposure times for your resin and the first few layers should get 60 seconds of ...


4

Default settings for first layer height in Slic3r Prusa Edition print profiles regardless layer height is 0.2 mm. If you need to improve bed adhesion then try tips from this video 3D Prints not sticking anymore? Watch this! 3DP101 by Maker's Muse. It's about using glue stick and spreading it using paper towel and isopropyl alcohol. There are other ...


4

Ultimaker Cura print bed size sizes (shrinks) when you enable skirt, brim or raft build adhesion options. Try to print without build plate adhesion option if you want to push printing to the limits of the build plate. Furthermore, you mention the use of PVA, using 2 cores, the priming print tower also needs space to be printed, this can be also limiting your ...


4

When a print is not printing on the build platform, you either: Have the incorrect settings in the slicer (e.g. Ultimaker Cura, a common mistake is that the "origin at center" option is active), or Have the center of the bed incorrectly stored in your firmware. (See: How to center my prints on the build platform? (Re-calibrate homing offset) or ...


4

Isopropyl alcohol (IPA) is the general recommendation I've heard and it works well for me.


4

It all depends on what you mean by "flat". Is the problem that the build plate isn't flat (perfectly planar), or is the problem that the distance to the build plate varies based on X and Y coordinates? They are very different problems. "Bed Leveling" is the process of allowing the firmware to know the Z position of the build plate for every (X,Y) location....


3

I've done it. Yes it will print just fine. Treat it like any other bed surface BUT... A few points to keep in mind and to consider. Normal glass It will break fast. Had mine last a few weeks. It is not strong. If your Z endstop fails then it will crack Higher thermal expansion than other options. So parts pop off bed when it cools While we are talking ...


3

Before I got an aftermarket heated print bed for my M3D, I regularly used a hair dryer to pre-heat the build plate up to 60-70 °C before printing with no ill effects.


3

I agree to Tom's first part of the answer, usually you'd cool down the plate to loosen the print. This is reasoned by the shrinkage of the builplate while the print stays extended. The strain put into the interface helps to get the print of. Warming the plate could essentially do the same, but since you deposit a warm filament, one would assume that by ...


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