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8

As Trish states, a print service would appear to be your best bet. Building a printer large enough may work out costing more than the print service, especially if it is only for one print of a proof of concept. Anecdotally, I visited a 3D Printing shop in Bangkok, JWH High tech Garden, that had a huge Delta printer that had, reputably, cost a million baht (~...


7

I do not know about your project, but the size of the final object. Smaller prints glued together Just design smaller parts and glue them together. Take a look on this video, where Joel Telling glues OpenRC Formula parts. Hangprinter Interesting concept is Hangprinter where volume size depends on your room size. It's a RepRap so you have to build it ...


7

I’m assuming you are working in the Part Design workbench. Select the sketch and click Edit->duplicate selected object. Make sure that only the sketch is copied (depending on the version, either deselect the plane or click don’t include dependent objects). This will produce a duplicate sketch in the active body (if you want the duplicate in a different ...


6

I don't believe that slicing engines create any sort of solid model that would be useful for CAD simulation. When a slicing engine slices a 3D model, it's goal is to spit out the preferred machine paths in G-Code (of some kind). However, I've read a few articles, done some tests, and heard through the grape vine that anywhere between 10%-35% is good enough ...


6

STL is the de facto standard in consumer-grade 3D printing. It is a bare-bone format that describes the shape of the object by defining the coordinates of all the vertices of all triangles that a surface may be subdivided into. This means that in STL any curved surface is represented with an approximation of many very small faces. OBJ is also somewhat ...


5

As far as I know there is not a workbench capable of producing the design you want with a single click "new worm gear". But it is a rather simple affair to create the part you want from scratch. What you want to do is to sweep a sketch along a helix. It is a very similar process to the one you would follow to create a thread documented in the official ...


5

The correct/good method to achieve this is called "rigging", but it is not an easy feat (as pointed out by others), as it requires plenty of knowledge about the software being used to edit the model, and a good understanding of the theory behind it. Skeletal animation requires the designer to set up a skeleton (also called "rig", hence the slang term "...


5

a good way to convert a 3D print file like STL to STEP a useable file format for plastic injection molding companies I don't know much about plastic injection molding companies, but I do manipulate a lot STEP, STL files and I do know that it is possible to achieve "a good way to convert […] STL to STEP file format […]". For the record, the manufacturing ...


5

I don't know that this can be definitively answered for a specific printer and all arbitrary designs. The refinement level basically determines how smooth a curved surface will turn out. The STL file format can only express an object in terms of triangular-shaped surfaces, so Fusion 360 will need to approximate a curved surface by breaking it up into ...


4

Not directly. The most common types of 3D printers build objects in layers. They "draw" a layer, then "draw" another layer slightly above it, repeating until they've "drawn" the entire model. Preparing your model for this is called "slicing", since you are "slicing" your model into these layers. Slicing is a complex process and it's a lot of work to "roll ...


4

First, copyright laws are complex and depend heavily on the specific details. IMO, your question is really too broad to answer. An interesting example of how details and interpretation affect whether something is a violation or not is Kienitz v Sconnie Nation. In this case a copyrighted photo was clearly copied, modified, and used to make a t-shirt that ...


4

If you're talking about the shape of the end result, rather than the constituent elements of the model - the answer is no, there is no simple geometric restriction. Have a look at 3D benchy for an example of how print quality can be affected by different aspects. One obvious issue is overhangs, so the orientation of the part is important for printing. A ...


4

Welcome to the site! In regards to quads, vs polygon. People will often reduce the overall detail to make it easier to print. But so long as after you export it to a STL and verify that your Manifold edges were done correctly and what you though was solid is solid, you should be good to go. As near as I can tell so long as you can export it to STL then it ...


4

First a disclaimer: I am far from an expert on the subject, I'm just a regular Joe who happens to use OpenSCAD and have done some experimentation with it. I believe the answer below to be correct, but I will be very grateful if errors or misconceptions were brought to my attention in the comments. :) I have read that sometimes the function render is ...


4

Selecting the body in the browser will select the entire body. Clicking on the body in the viewer will only get you faces or edges. A long click (click and hold) on the model will give you options on what to select. You can choose a face or body under "Depth" or choose a body or feature under "Parents."


4

I posted this to an Autodesk forum, and a fellow named "MagWeb" proposed the following solution. I have not tried it yet. A possible workflow depends much on the overall shape of the voronoi object: If it's convex all over (like an egg) or convex and planar (like a cylinder) e.g: SelectAll (Ctrl+A or Cmd+A on MAC) Run Edit/FitPrimitive ...


4

YesIf you have the money Either read here or look at the ones I plucked out of that list to show you: First of all, 3D printers on FDM basis can become quite large, if you pay extra. And the price goes up really fast as the dimensions grow because the demands on stability grow exponentially. Larger Printers? One example of a "scaling" printer ...


4

So long as you are not dealing with MortonThiokol issues, there is a simple tradeoff: high-cost printer vs. breaking down your design into smaller parts with assembly features. Many designers publish designs which snap-fit together; others suggest glue; still others go the safe route of providing clearance holes and requiring metal nuts&bolts to ...


4

Marlin has G2 (clockwise arc) and G3 (counterclockwise arc) commands that could be used to do this. You can find detailed documentation for the command here. Basically, you can use G2 R1 X5 Y5 to draw a (clockwise) arc from the current position to $(X,Y)=(5,5)$ with a radius of $1$. So, your rounded triangle could be drawn with 3 straight line moves ...


4

First, convert the given measurements into a sketch... G-code shenanigans we actually have the printer do circles.. let's plot that out... Using that, it's easy to write the G-code using the Documentation for G1 and G2. You'll have to add the E values to extrude something along the paths, but your sketch would turn into this path: G92 X0 Y0 ; the current ...


3

As is typical with many CAD type programs, a feature in Onshape known as revolve may be your solution. As you have a clear formula for the cross-section, half of the work is complete. You would generate a sketch representing the curve, then use the Revolve feature with the axis oriented to vertical. According to the Onshape video, you can generate a solid ...


3

Yes, there is a "select" tool in the toolbar next to "make". You can use select filters to select components, bodies and faces.


3

Basically there's no good easy way to do this. At this point you only have the mesh - a list of triangles - the 3D model you have does not contain the concept of joints or moving parts so it can't regenerate the shoulder after the rotation. The original author may or may not have the ability to do this, depending on his workflow and software. If all you ...


3

Since I am not able to comment on this question yet, I thought I would provide an answer in addition to the already helpful insight provided. If the question in general is regarding infill percentage, and the common follow-up regards part stiffness, then it should be explained that choosing infill percentage is much more than just part stiffness. Printing ...


3

I've been able to manipulate an STL file using the hobbyist version (free) of Fusion 360. There's a series of steps involved that may require some research and experimentation, at least it did in my case. One loads the STL file into Fusion 360 by using Insert, Mesh. Once loaded, turn off history. The next step is to convert the mesh file to BREP. In that ...


3

The fact you may be able to produce a STP file is no guarantee the company will be able to injection mold it. You should ask the intended recipient of the file what are the actual requirements they need for making the injection mold. STEP and STL are not two different ways to store the same information. They are two different standards with different ...


3

It depends very much on the molding company, and how much engineering service you can afford to buy from them. Some will remodel your entire part anyway, to make it suitable for molding. Others will only accept specific formats and parts that are engineered 100 % ready to be molded. So talk to them first, if they only use your file as a template, it ...


3

I am sorry to inform you, that the answer to "How do I fix the thickness" is "Remodel them" - especially in this case as the whole design is... awkward. But you don't necessarily need to resign them from scratch, if you can fix it... But beware, fixing does only work sometimes... First of all, Blender is NOT a good modeling software for designing parts ...


3

.stl Basics The .stl format has no inherent sense of which units you use. items are to scale to an ambiguous 1, which could be 1 meter, one millimeter, one lightyear or one inch. To a .stl, only the relative sizing matters. All these faces you see are compared to a line with the length of 1-unit that is Slicer-Modeling Software interaction The most common ...


3

I've had good results with using the free web-based program known as Onshape which allows you to import/create 3D models. One of the features built into Onshape is a drawing tab. You can select the views desired or use a standard layout, as well as add dimensions to the individual drawing views. This image above was of a model created in and exported from ...


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