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They are all generic guidelines. Don't count on them too much. Rather, get an approximate Z-offset value, then print a solid 30x30x5 mm cube. If, starting from the third-fourth layer, you see some over-extrusion, you need to adjust the extrusion multiplier or the E steps calibration and reprint. Once the solid cube looks good starting from the third-fourth ...


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OK, let's start with your pictures. Putting aside the expansion in the XY plane, layer 1 looks seriously underextruded (gaps between the lines, even) while layers 2 and 3 look severely overextruded. It would be possible to achieve this with a reduced first-layer flow setting, but you haven't indicated that, and moreover, in addition to looking underextruded, ...


2

This is a very well known issue that is caused by insufficient adhesion. The corners curl up during printing. You should increase the adhesion by: cleaning the bed (I use water and soap, others use isopropyl alcohol) better leveling, correct nozzle to build plate distance (dragging paper method), using a brim or so-called mouse ears in your design, ...


2

PID tuning can be performed multiple times and the results saved for future use, since the question is about "what are the usable ranges for PID tuning", based on my experience a slightly suboptimal tuning will not make the temperature oscillate more than 2-3 degrees, which is more than enough for most traditional filaments if you have a 30-40 °C ...


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The skew correction works in X/Y axis while bed screws helps you correct the ax axis. Since they don’t work in the same axis, I don’t see why they would interfere with each other.


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It's not a straight answer, but you don't have to run PID tuning every time you decide to print with different temperature. (Until you change something in a hardware near or related to the hotend.) You can tune PID for different temperatures and grab necessary values, for example: M303 C16 D1 E0 S190 22:14:31.872 > PID Autotune finished! Put the last Kp, ...


1

I think this is resolved. After looking at every conceivable source of over-extrusion and coming up negative, R.. GitHub STOP HELPING ICE suggested that it might be a mechanical problem in Z axis movement, like in this question. I checked by leveling the bed and zeroing the Z axis at 0.05 mm above the bed, using a feeler gauge. I gave it the instruction to ...


1

Lowering speed on outer perimeter has always been mostly wrong, but possibly useful. Usually, it's a poor approximation for what you really want to do, which is lowering acceleration on the outer perimeter, to avoid surface quality and dimensional accuracy errors due to ringing and backlash. However, on bowden printers without compensation for pressure (&...


1

Generally, there is no best way, there are only the ways that work for you. I use a feeler gauge, mounted on a detachable holder. I home to 0, lift the Z by 1 mm, and then level the bed to the same number on the screws and corners. Then I home back to Z=0 and perform an extrusion test, and if that is not satisfactory, use a different number for the leveling. ...


1

Your bed level according to the sensor and reality is changing between the time of probing and the time of printing. There is not enough info to determine exactly where the problem is, but the possible causes and solutions are most likely: Bed or X-carriage is mechanically loose: ensure all axis and parts of the printer are tight, including the hot-end ...


1

There are 3 effects at work, and you misread your micrometer: the measurement is 19.35 in the picture. You have a little lip There's a little lip at the top and bottom of the print. You'd need to clean that up with a sharp knife or sandpaper. That is the biggest part of the error you measure. Movement errors accumulate Errors also collect on the center of ...


1

The developers explained the use of the M425 code themselves. We devised a routine for measuring Z backlash automatically during G29 and found that software backlash compensation does wonders for the first layer. However, this comes at the expense of artifacts on the rest of the print. In particular, any rapid motions of the motor to try to take up any ...


1

In case someone still has this problem I have a solution for what happened in my case. I am using a 3DTouch and I also encountered the same problem and it was solved by commenting //#define BLTOUCH_HS_MODE


1

It is normal to have different filaments with different hardness, therefore the teeth of the gears will bite at different depth in the filament strand. As result, the effective steps/mm will change and you should have a calibration per type of filament. Repeating the calibration for each new spool is not needed, if you only change brand or colour, but at the ...


1

That above is not entirely true. Maybe in a perfect world but we are far away from that. Just this week I tested it with an All-Metal MicroSwiss. Calibrated with PETG at 240 °C. Result E116 Calibrated with PLA at 180 °C. Result E96... A huge deviation one can't control with the flow. The more smart way to calibrate the extruder would be to remove the ...


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Taken from a rejected suggested edit. If the author (Gareth) posts their own answer, this can be deleted, or flagged for deletion My Ender 3 is not warped in any way but there are several issues I needed to address: Extrusion: Check your extruder and Z eSteps for accuracy, as detailed in numerous places. Test layer width: print a cube in vase mode (1 shell ...


1

I just flashed my new Ender 5 with Marlin and I had the same issue. The 2nd and 3rd layers were digging into the previous layers. I manually lowered the bed by 10 mm via the machine knob and the bed only moved 5.207 mm (I used a dial caliper). I went into the EEPROM and adjusted the steps/mm for the Z from 400 to 769: 10 mm /5.207 mm is 1.921 400x1.921 is ...


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