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15

I believe the little experiment made by E3D - the same link you provide - answers your question very well. Several points about wear can be found in this article. After printing only 250 grams of ColorFabb XT-CF20 (carbon fiber filament): The nozzle diameter had increased markedly The inner walls of the orifice (opening) showed deep sharp ridges and grooves ...


10

Steel is the best material for a linear rod when you have a fixed cross-section. It will have the least flex of any rod (aside from some exotic metals) of the same size. Carbon fiber's material properties might seem superior at first sight, but the stiffness is very anisotropic -- it's very stiff along the grain and not very stiff across the grain. So ...


8

I agree that steel is the best material for rails but the info provided on carbon fiber is just wrong. When making a carbon fiber part, whether a tube or any other shape, you lay the fabric in the orientation you need for the direction of the forces. If multi-directional strength and stiffness is needed then the fibers are laid in multiple directions. ...


7

One of the things I look for is if you pull the print head a good ways off the bed and have it extrude. It should just squirt plastic straight down. If it bends sharply in one direction, or even curls back on itself, then that is a sign of damage.


1

Ok, first of all you need to understand why the limit is given at 250 °C: that's when the hotend design chosen by the Monoprice starts to destroy its PETG liner. To print hotter, you'd need an unlined hotend, which means you'd need a proper all metal hotend. A proper all metal hodend is a tradeoff, not an upgrade: you sacrifice some ease of printing and risk ...


1

According to the inner diameter doesn't change much, but, as said by @0scar, the nozzle shortens and at the end you get to the inner cavity. Check the length and you are done.


1

TL;DR You could compare the nozzle to a similar new nozzle to look for wear. The creators of the Olsson Ruby Nozzle have published some pictures of wear on brass, steel and hardened steel nozzles. From their website the following image is taken: Depending on the amount of filament that is being printed, not only the internal dimensions, but also the outer ...


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