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12

This is not universally valid G-code, and how it is handled depends on the implementation. You can use this style of comment on some machines, but not all. The way parsing used to be implemented in Marlin (a very common 3D printer firmware), it would work fine unless the comment string included a X, Y, Z, E or F character. The parser simply looks for the ...


4

Expanding on some previous comments which are probably enough to warrant an answer: What Trish said is completely right. Leadscrews are readily available parts and any dimensional errors in the leadscrews will be reflected in the output of your CNC machine unless you have some sort of compensation for them. Moreover, if the material is not highly rigid, the ...


4

This is simply the formalised definition of the syntax, so that a parser can be written to interpret any legal G-code. Without this, there is ambiguity - not in the general operation, but in the bounds of what is 'legal' and what should be rejected. Taking the example X+053, this is not a position of 53 units, it is: Address X Sign is required (in this ...


4

It looks like comments inside parentheses are not allowed in numerous parsers (ie. Marlin). This seems to be true for most of the 3D printers. Classical CNC milling machines use parentheses without problems. It should work on Prusa printers as stated in their Wiki. Unfortunately there are no words about nesting of the comments. I have however found a comment ...


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At Hyrel, where I work, we use a 12 VDC, 3.5 A, 40 W spindle tool with 1/4" chuck and 3,000 rpm max (without load) to make prototype circuit boards by machining through the copper layer to make isolation traces.


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There are several sources of PCB "etching" bits. They tend to be single straight flutes and high angle, very pointy bits. For the motor, high speed is good. Look for 30k+ RPM. The main thing to be concerned about is the amount of runout, or wobble in the tip. With a tiny tip, you can't afford much runout at all. It will broaden the gap you are cutting ...


4

As @fred_dot_u mentioned above, keychains are a simple, personalized item to make. In terms of interesting projects, things that I found intriguing when I first encountered 3D printing were objects that could not be made by other means, such as those "geared bearings" (Google: geared bearings 3d print). Given the popularity of figet spinners a while back, ...


3

Our local library makerspace holds summer camp for a limited number of lucky attendees, ages from 12-15 and the curriculum has a segment which appears to match your objective. In the case of the Launch Pad Camp, the campers will be using OnShape to create a keychain/nametag with text of their choosing. It will be an unremarkable 3mm thick x 35-40 mm wide x ...


3

You can use both .gcode and .gbr files one one machine. We do it where I work. However, when we make prototype circuit boards, we don't print them; we acquire circuit board blanks, and then we either: Use a diode laser to burn off the top layer of garolite for isolation traces, then do a chemical dip to remove that copper, then another laser burn to expose ...


3

Auto bed leveling requires some settings (constants) in the configuration of your Marlin firmware. It is recommended to read about the implementation of automatic bed leveling first. There are a few options to choose the kind of leveling, for 3D printers a commonly chosen option is AUTO_BED_LEVELING_BILINEAR which is the best option if you do not know if ...


3

Is it possible? Yes. Is it advisable? No Lead screws need to be smooth and have little to no stretch and there can be a lot of tension on them. However, 3D prints are quite rough by the way they are made and super weak on tension forces - and not have a good compression withstanding either. a 3D printed leadscrew is therefore not adviseable, especially since ...


2

If your printer is reliable enough I would suggest printing multiple parts in one go. Since the cylinders are only 12 mm in diameter you can easily fit over a hundred of them on a standard 20 x 20 cm built plate with a couple of millimeters spacing in between.


1

Generally, movement in a CNC, FDM-Printer, laser cutter, and Plotter has the XY plane decoupled from the Z-axis in most operations. As a result, the path in the XY plane is in 2D. But how to get to a path? Well, we have 2 variants: Pixel Most pictures store information as Pixels: each pixel on a grid has a color assigned to it. Scaling the picture does ...


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TL;DR From Davo's and cmm's answers there seems to be a wide range of drill spindle speeds used (3k-30k rpm). So, just to add to that... 11,000 rpm would appear to be adequate. I have been looking into converting a Wilson II 3D printer chassis into a CNC PCB etching machine, recently. In particular, what motor I needed to replace the extruder with. A ...


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Please look into this question, this is a very similar question and also involves PWM and a RAMPS 1.4 shield. In your case you connect the top red wire on the right bottom connector to the D4 pin and adjust the firmware accordingly as described in this answer. The bottom 2 wires of the lower right connector should be connected to ground and 12 V (...


1

This question is unfortunately, not a good fit for this site, as it stands, for as you say it is opinion based. However, it is great to see that you are getting kids into a relatively new technology (yes, I know it has been around for years, but it is still seen as new to big media and the general public). My answer doesn't provide you with any actual ...


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Well, few years ago I could set the software Mach3 for printing doing the next: Set a profile for 3D printing for the faster movements that your CNC can support; for example some CNC uses standard threads, others ACME threads and other GT2 belts like the 3D printers. If we try to use a feed rate too high the motors will shake. For this profile is not needed ...


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