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11

I just started with google and phrase "3d printing color mixing" and on the first place (in fact first two were valueless adverts) I got this Instructables - DIY Full Color Mixing 3D Printer. How it works? It uses magenta / cyan / yellow filaments and mixes it while printing with Diamond hotend. It definitely does what you are asking for and it's exactly ...


9

This is an ugly question, and an ugly answer. Nail polish doesn't come with an ingredient list. Nor are there MSDS's available to refer to what solvents are in it. So it's "unknown 1" Most every filament company will not give you a list of compounds for colorants or plasticizers used. MSDS is off the table. So, even though we do know what PLA and ABS is ...


9

The most obvious solution is to pause the print and swap filament for another color. Another option is to splice pieces of filament together, though this does not allow very precise control of when the switch happens. There is also a device that can automatically slice filament this way. Finally, another option that uses very little external equipment is ...


8

The three in one print head is the closest to your concept of gradient printing and does some nice transitions. But does not meet your color mixing. Which I assume your looking for there is something like blue and yellow making green and by varying those percent getting shades of green. The three in one head does get close to a dot by dot transition. ...


7

I've seen where certain slicers and/or firmware installations will allow you to set pauses mid-print so you can insert a different filament and resume. Such firmware that I'm aware of is Sailfish. I haven't personally used this, but I've heard many great things for people who enjoy tinkering with their machine(s). Alternatively, there are 3D-printable ...


6

A Kickstarter campaign just finished for a full color 3D FDM printer, the RoVa4D Full Color Blender 3D Printer. It used CYMK printing and includes black and white filament for 5 color filament feeds, plus additional feeds for flexible and support filaments. They raised \$216k against a target of \$25k. The company that is doing this has other printers ...


5

At this point in time I don't think there is a need to be concerned with purity of filaments based on pigmentation. For the most part, variations in filament quality due to coloring should be the least of your concerns compared to some of the other variables such as quality of the pellets, extrusion temperature (when manufactured), cooling rate (after ...


5

Another approach is Mosaic Manufacturing's Palette – it appears to a single extruder 3D printer as a filament reel, but it is creating a custom filament on-the-fly by pulling information from a multi-extruder .gcode file to determine the length, and the order, each color segment needs to be. The device was a successful Kickstarter campaign and as far as ...


5

Unless you plan to use your copter outside Earth atmosphere or expected lifetime is more than tenths of years, UV degradation should not be a problem for PETG. Some of the net sources indicate the possibility of degradation after significant time of constant exposure to outdoor conditions (mostly color change), which sounds mostly like absence of practical ...


5

Branching off of TomvanderZanden's answer, this process cannot easily be done with an extruder alone. To properly color polymers, a pigment must be added during the initial treatment process (otherwise applied during any heat treatment). These pigments do not necessarily allow a simple red + blue = purple process to change the color for many reasons ...


5

As darth_pixel points out, people have had limited success with feeding multiple colors into a diamond hotend and mixing them, but I would argue this is not truly what you're looking for. The problem is that when feeding multiple filaments into a diamond-style hotend, the colors do not naturally mix completely: if you look at an object printed this way the ...


4

Industry has for years used a 'pad printer' to put images on complex shapes, like plastic or ceramic travel mugs, etc. I have observed these, but never used one. I see no reason why there couldn't be a DIY version made. Best of luck, and I look forward to seeing what you come up with!


4

Answering this question fully depends on the type of printer you have. Some printers have a pause capability, while others do not. Some have multiple extruders, while most do not. Some have a tube leading to the extruder and others do not. You specifically are asking about dealing with more than two colors when you have a dual-extruder, but the question ...


3

I spoke with a chemist tonight. He said to start with the SDS (or MSDS) for the filament, which is required to be available for most materials. It should list the pigments and additives if they are not recognized as safe. If they are safe, non-toxic, not flammable, non-reactive, they might not be disclosed on the data sheet. He warns that sometimes ...


3

The color changing material used in the filament is most likely a Leuco dye. There are several types and some can be abrasive (just like the glow in the dark dyes); but, they aren't like putting sand through your nozzle. Since brass is really soft, even something like the dyes can cause it to wear; but, it will take a while. The safest bet is to use a ...


3

Nail polish will not damage your PLA model. 1) Let's talk about "gel" nail polish. Gel polish self-levels, does not drip, is cheap, is much more health-friendly than many finishing methods, and only takes 30 seconds under a suitable strength UV/LED lamp to dry, providing a thick smooth coat (clear, color, glitter!, anything) that makes any layer lines ...


3

I think this will work for you... Laser Printer Image Transfer: Print reverse image with color laser printer on regular paper. Apply Mod Podge or artist arcylic or artist matte gel to the 3d printed surface. You may need to sand it first to get it nice and smooth. Apply same to picture and put picture, face down, onto the surface that you're transferring ...


3

No Dyes at all. Your question is based on a misconception: A dye is a coloured substance that chemically bonds to the substrate to which it is being applied, this distinguishes dyes from pigments which do not chemically bind to the material they colour.Wikipedia The coloration does not chemically bond with the plastic in production. It is thus a pigment ...


2

The standard option is to change out filaments at certain times during the print. Software to add these pauses to your print automatically are around, with one (ColorPrint). This method works if you only want to change at a certain Z height, and not intermix colors on the same levels. The other newer development that works for many printers (this works for ...


2

The Z-corp/3D systems printers lay down what is essentially ink in each layer (only around the perimeters) much like an inkjet printer, dying the powder as the parts are made. This means they can make almost any color at any point in the model. The down size is these models are pretty fragile, at least the last ones that I have handled. This can be helped by ...


2

I would not expect a problem. The greatest problem I would expect would be if the PLA layers were not well bonded, and the coating material could work in between layers. If so, over time the difference in water absorption or thermal expansion could further separate the layers.


2

Per the 3MF Specification, colors in the .3mf files are sRGB. If you are looking at gross color defects, I would look a the raw codes generated in the 3mf to make sure they make sense. If you are talking about subtle color differences, that is much more complicated. Color have always been a tough thing to define as it is affected by whether the it is ...


2

Rather than post a series of links for various services and vendors, consider to use as a search term "hydrographic film at home" to find results to suit your purpose. The first search results I found excluded "at home" and indicated it was not suited for home/hobbyist use, but the modification resulted in vendors supportive of home users. In advanced ...


2

OK, it just turned up on Thingiverse that someone has demonstrated a trivial machine to do exactly what I asked for: any FDM printer. Its sounds crazy, but it works! This technique will allow you to create one offs, and to color match your 3D-prints. It works by changing the filament (and the color) of your filament while printing, and this causes a multi ...


2

You may be a bit misled here. First of all, you do not want "RGB" , as those are additive colors such as used when combining light sources. You do want "RYB" (red-yellow-blue) or the more accurate CMY(plus K just to get a 'truer' black) for subtractive colors. Next, there's really no reason to attempt pixel-mixing. What should happen, ideally, is that ...


2

You're quite right :) L (AC): Brown colour. Single Phase line or Three Phase Line (L1) N (AC): Blue colour. Neutral GND: Green and yellow colours. Protective earth or ground (PE) COM: DC Negative (-) - Also referred to as "Common" V+: DC Positive (+) V(ADJ). This is for a potentiometer, in order to modify the output voltage. You won't need this unless ...


1

I fear your supposition about secret --> open secret is too optimistic. Manufacturers are very unlikely to reveal their components, or the mix ratio, used to create a given color. Consider the Coca-cola formula. It's been a secret for over a hundred years, despite a number of competing cola-ish brands. Consider also that the label you buy is the ...


1

NO if you want to smooth your print, gently heat the plastic and with a utensil smooth out the plastic. A hair dryer is a good way of doing this but be careful to only lightly melt the outside of the model.


1

PETG might not be the best for long term UV exposure. According to Midland Plastics, PETG doesn't hold up well in outdoor applications, and is susceptible to UV degradation. Unless you have an outdoor or UV rated PETG product which will have additional chemicals added to it, it may breakdown more quickly than you would expect. (the link I used was : http://...


1

Fortunately, PLA accepts many types of paints, most common of them is acrylic paint. Acrylic is water-soluble until it dries, then it becomes water-resistant. Depending on the goal you plan to achieve, different types of paints can be used - oil paint, already mentioned acrylic, enamels or lacquers. Keeping in mind that manufacturers may present different ...


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