Hot answers tagged

21

Layer Times See my answer to this question and pay particular attention to my suggestion about a minimum layer print time. I'm not sure if all slicing engines provide this option, but I know MakerWare/MakerBot Desktop and (possibly) Slic3r allow this setting. Basically, when you're extruding smaller features like this, the previous layer(s) are still very ...


18

It is hard to tell whether you personally should enclose your printer. However, you asked for the advantages and I will name some of them on which one can base a decision. A 3D printer enclosure helps to keep the temperature of the whole print at controlled levels, if you use a heating element, thermocouple and pid regulator. This is one of the most direct ...


17

The function of the front fan is keeping the cold end well... cold. :) It should be spinning as long as the printer is turned on. The right fan is known as "part fan" and its function is to cool down the plastic that has been just extruded, the idea being to solidify it as soon as possible. As you noticed it is controlled by the gcode and it can be turned ...


10

What bed material cools faster? I found an extensive list which relates various materials to their thermal conductivity, k [W/mK]; the lower thermal conductivity, the better the material insulates, and the slower the print bed will resist changes in temperature - both heating up, and cooling down. Here are the thermal conductivity for some common ...


10

@kamuro provided an excellent answer, so I'll just try to add by playing devil's advocate. Possible things to look out for: Inappropriate enclosure could result in more temperature differences, resulting in higher rates of warping and delamination. For example, if you do not enclose the top of your machine, then the temperature at the beginning of your ...


7

You should run the fan at what you expect it to be at the majority of the time it is printing. If you tune at 100% fan and never use a fan then it will be too aggressive, if you tune at 0% fan and use the fan then you will struggle to maintain/reach temperature.


7

Warping. Especially with materials like ABS, you want the plastic to cool down as gradually (and slowly) as possible, to prevent the print from warping as the cooling plastic contracts. On small layers, cooling is usually mandatory: with really small layers, you just end up with a big glob of molten plastic if the previous layer hasn't solidified enough ...


6

The heated bed port on your board has a 11A fuse. It will not work for a heated bed requiring 16A of current, no matter how good the MOSFETs might be. Note that the terminal block might also not be rated for that much current. You'd have to check, because often it is not the MOSFET itself that catches fire but the wiring or terminal blocks. Also, keep in ...


5

Prior to a move the print cooling fan causes the filament to cool on the outside while the nozzle is still hot, when it then moves it causes a strings to form that will be cooled instantly. This means that the cooling you have is too much and should be reduced. This printer has a single fan to cool the cold-end and the print through a slot with the same fan....


5

Cooling any single face of the motor is fine. The motor case conducts heat very well. Many 3d printers effectively cool the motors merely by having the output drive face of the motor bolted to a metal bracket which is bolted to the aluminum extrusion frame. That's it. That contact alone cools the motor, which is shown by how the motors overheat when people ...


5

Getting hot air from the radiator is definitely wrong idea because of few reasons: hot air can damage your fan (as they are usually not heatproof). Cold air cools the fan cold air is denser so fan can suck more cold air than hot air so cooling is more efficient (fig A) in terms of plug of radiator (with dust) it's much better to try to push cold air into ...


5

According to the M109 G-code the documentation, the printer will wait to reach temperature given with S only when heating. With R, the printer will wait also when cooling down. So if the answer of mac fails to work, try: M109 R60 ; wait for nozzle temp to drop to 60 °C


5

[TL:DR] - If you can comfortably hold the nozzle with your fingers, you are good to go In order to understand how long one should wait, it is important to understand why one has to wait. All modern consumer-grade FDM printers have their printing head made of two assemblies: the cold end, where the extruder stepper motor is located and the filament must be ...


4

Without more information we cannot address what is causing your edges to turn up. This can depend on the model being printed, the process, the material, the bed, and the method used to bond it to the bed. As far as the initial question, a fan will most certainly ensure uneven cooling. The middle of the print is, and will remain, the warmest. If you want ...


4

It appears that there isn't an "out-of-the-box" solution to your request, but luck is with you. Someone with your board and objective has posted what appears to be a reasonable modification: http://www.instructables.com/id/Add-a-Cooling-Fan-to-your-Rep-Rap-Sanguinololu/


4

The symptoms you describe hint to heat creep. Heat creep is the gradual increase in temperature of the cold end assembly (cooling fins and heat break). This gradual temperature increase leads to too high filament temperatures and as such premature filament softening. In combination with (large) retraction settings, this can lead to clogging of the nozzle. ...


4

As discussed in the comments... The problem with the fan seems to be its flimsy attachment to the printer head. The fact the fan chassis is not firmly kept in place allows for it to act as a soundboard, amplyfing whatever vibration nomally occurs in the motor. You could probably get a fan that is more silent in the first place (noctua is a known brand for ...


3

The fans are allowing the strings to harden instead of break. Maybe you should use more retraction or wipe before crossing perimeters to reduce material ooze during moves.


3

Your solution will not cool all sides effectively. Firstly don't use zip ties; get thermal tape. (https://www.amazon.com/Thermal-Interface-Products-Heat-Sink/dp/B00QSHPH8E/ Secondly, the heat will need to travel around the outside of the motor to get from the side that doesn't have the water block. Its expensive but you could use Pyrolytic Graphite Sheets ...


3

The printer already has a built in fan with a fan shroud that directs air to the hotend Unless your printer is defective, it may look like so, but the airflow should really be directed towards the print, not the hot-end. Cooling the hot-end will at best just waste energy, requiring extra heat to keep it hot, at worst affect your print quality negatively. ...


3

First of all, we need to discuss the failure mode and what can be done. LEt's do a Failure mode 1: coolend-fan stops working. Let's assume the coolend-fan for whatever reason (cut cable, defect fan, burnt board...) stops working. As a result, the coolend starts to rise in temperature, as it doesn't drain as much heat into the room air as before. This ...


2

I believe you might be having an issue with insufficient cooling. Remember the suggestion to have wait times per layer to let the previous layer cool? Well, I think with your setup and print not only do individual layers overheat, but individual parts of each layer. You either need to try more direct or dual fan cooling or maybe use a nozzle with thinner ...


2

Assuming you are meaning the build plate and not confusing it with a printed raft, yes, different materials for the build plate will have different cooling rates. I don't know the values of hand, but a Google search can get you to a formula to calculate how long a certain size build plate of a given material type should roughly take to cool. (I'm using the ...


2

This effect you describe is a commonly known problem that occurs when the print part cooling fan is not correctly positioned, i.e. if it blows air directly onto the nozzle or heater block and is best solved by printing an alternative part cooling fan duct. Alternatively you could insulate the heater block with some insulation cotton or silicone socks that ...


2

Yes you can use another fan port, this requires some editing of the configuration files of the firmware and reflash the firmware. If you look at the documentation of the board and an overview of the board layout, you will see that there are 3 PWM controlled FAN ports. The answer is therefore yes, you can use another port (e.g. FAN1 or FAN2) to be used for ...


2

The RUMBA board has two fan outputs. The primary fan output is switched by pin 7, the secondary one by pin 8. The reason your fan is not working when you set #define EXTRUDER_0_AUTO_FAN_PIN 8 is because it's switching the secondary fan. If you switch the wires over to the secondary fan output it will work correctly. If you do want to use the primary fan ...


2

I just did this lol and checked online to see if anyone else did it too. It works really nice. I used thermal paste and zipties to secure each block to the stepper motor. Dont use thermal tape its not as effective as paste. I had to do this operations since my motors were overheating due to the enclosure design.


2

If the fan you are using is not defective and if you test another fan that behaves in a similar manner, it's possible your firmware or hardware are the root cause of the problem. The controller directs the driver to vary the power provided to the fan. It's a method called pulse wave modulation, aka PWM. Full voltage is applied to the fan one hundred percent ...


2

It will work, but likely with reduced performances: designing blades is not an easy task and the ones you can print will not be as good as the ones designed for that specific fan. Overall, do it for fun before you replace the fan anyway. IF your fan has symmetrical blades (unlikely), another option is to break the opposite blade to balance the fan.


2

On the printhead? TECs or Peltier Elements are incredibly inefficient compared to airstream coolers. Their only benefit is perfect temperature control, from which you will have nothing because there is no firmware that cares for the temperature of cooling air or the cooling body of a Hotend. Also, a TEC creates a lot of heat on its output side - which means ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible