6

TL;DR: Don't do that. Detailed answer: You need motion limit parameters that actually make physical sense, and firmware capable of executing a motion plan according to them. Your jerk and acceleration settings absolutely don't. Marlin's whole implementation of jerk is wacky (note: modern Marlin versions don't even use it but an alternative they call "...


4

I removed the mat from the bed and popped the print off


3

You need to figure out what is not working Is the hotend getting hot? If not, melted filament won't come out. Is the nozzle clogged? In your toolkit was a bit of thin wire for poking into the nozzle - try that and see what happens. You may need to heat the hotend, extract the filament, wait for it to cool, remove the bowden tube and push the wire up ...


3

The top image looks as if the (top) layer(s) are under-extruding, the walls don't appear to be suffering from the same problem. The following image from a recent PETG print is typical for an FDM product. The deposited lines need to touch (actually, slightly overlapping, but the slicer will take care of that) each other: You will see texture (especially when ...


3

I finally found the problem. The threaded rod of the Z axis was not mounted tight enough to the motor. This resulted in the slipping of the Z axis by large accelerations of the motor. So... tightening the threaded rod connector socket and redoing the leveling solved the problem.


2

The way to optimise retraction is to use this retraction optimisation tool, which tests various retraction distances and speeds. Remember to perform this calibration AFTER you set pressure or linear advance, which has a higher priority. You will be able to pick the settings which work the best for that filament brand and type. You will have to do it again ...


2

This sounds like a bad thermistor. Try replacing the head thermistor, see if this fixes it. As for the strange error message, it looks like the word Temperature is being drawn on the wrong line, and then "is too low" writes over it. See the way the word lines up below: nozzle temperature is too lowperature


2

Sounds like you have incorrectly set up your machine, specifically the Z offset. Or your Z endstop is physically too low and not set up properly. I'd suggest recalibrating your machine from the start as that would help dial it in as well as potentially solve this issue. I recommend following this guide at the Teaching Tech 3D Printer Site - it's extremely ...


1

The basic RRF board has a single Z driver which connects to two Z stepper sockets. In order to individually drive two steppers, you need an optional stepper driver like in a dedicated Z2 stepper driver or a spare E1 driver to function as the second Z driver. The basic RRF board only has four drivers, so this board alone will not bring the functionality of ...


1

The following is from the article "Elephant's Foot - Easy Fixes" on All3DP.com As we’ve explained, elephant’s foot most often occurs as the result of an uncooled first layer. If the temperature of the print bed is too high, or if there’s insufficient cooling, the first layer may not cool properly, causing elephant’s foot. Here are a few things ...


1

This happened to me once - no plastic would come out, the extruder was jammed. I was stumped as to what was happening, as I couldn't put any filament through the hotend, but it was definitely still hot. The problem: don't ask me how it happened, but a small screw had somehow found its way into the hotend.


1

Advantage: It should print like regular PLA at PLA temperatures. Disadvantage: the embedded metal particles are abrasive and will widen your standard brass nozzle over time. The fix is to use a hardened steel nozzle, or for the extreme, there are options like ruby-tipped nozzles. Advantage: It should look "metallic" in a way that is more durable ...


1

A (pre-2019) stock ender3 can't print tpu because of a 3mm gap between the driver in the extruder and the bowden tube. But there are multiple adapter plates on thingiverse that close this gap, and then tpu works fine (with some tuning). I got tpu to work for small parts even without the adapter plate.


1

This is an issue I have had when doing maintenance on my printer. If your belt is too tight, it will cause resistance to the motor turning. In addition, you may not have properly set the motor current (tiny trimpot next to each motor driver).


1

One thing that would stop the X stepper is if the X-stop limit switch were stuck "on." The main function of the stop switches on the three axes is to prevent the printer from continuing to attempt to run after reaching "zero" position. If you trip the limit switch, the firmware will decide that you were at the zero for that axis, and ...


1

I had the same problem with an Ender 3 out of the box. I ended up adding a thin raft under each print. This would solve it if you don't want to do the manual adjusting.


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