8

Cool environmental conditions are the single biggest contributor to ABS delamination. Delamination or edge/corner cracking is caused by warping stresses when the first layer adhesion is stronger than the interlayer bonding. Or it happens when the heated build plate allows a strong non-warping foundation to be built until the print is too tall to be ...


6

First of all, the bed should be at 100-110 °C and fan 0 %. I had incredibly good results by using a (sacrificial) "draft shield" as shown below together with a large brim (10 mm). It creates a warmer micro-climate which keeps the print a bit warmer, with much less warping. My printer bed back then was 130x130 mm, therefore drafts were strong. You ...


4

You make no mention of a heated enclosure, so I assume you aren't using one. ABS undergoes significant contraction as it cools down. If you're not using an enclosure, the temperature differences between the heated bed, the cool middle of the print, and the heat of the freshly-printed plastic will cause severe warping.


4

I know some could not fit your question but maybe someone will look for all possibilities. Delamination can be caused by: filament humidity diameter extruder pressure (holdfast) - soft filament can be crumpled caused by extensive retraction) dirty jagger teeth (knurls) thermistor/wire failure - when it reports temp under ie 170C then extruder doesn't ...


3

I've been using Hatchbox 1.75 mm (but white), and settled on 190°C extruder temp, and 60°C bed. I've had trouble getting some prints to adhere to the bed, but most have been ok; I don't see a clear pattern. I don't know whether it's the fiber or my settings. I'm trying slightly higher temperatures, higher extrusion rates, and other filament brands to ...


3

Just to update on this, it wasn't directly a configuration setting, it was actually a blockage in the hotend (I suspect because the PTFE tube had become unseated from some black filament that was stated as 1.75 mm but I think it had a larger diameter). After clearing through my hotend with some PTFE tube, I found a disk of the black filament I initially ...


3

This is under extrusion, not delamination. Delamination is the result of the under extrusion. It typically happens when the wrong filament diameter has been set in the slicer (a larger diameter than used, e.g 2.85 mm instead of 1.75 mm). Another option is that you accidentally put the printer in volumetric printing mode which is accessible through the ...


3

If you are printing very thin walls, corners can be difficult. Rounding the corners helps. Also, if you can leave the outside square, but round the inside (making the corner slightly thicker), this can help.


2

With the information provided my thought is that your layers are underexposed for their thickness. Each layer is just barely bonding to the layer above it. After being pulled on by layers below eventually one of the layers fails. This is especially likely to happen on a thin part of the print any may need more support if it is followed by wider layers. But I ...


2

I know the original user has probably found an answer to their question by now, but I'll add my 2 cents for the benefit of others who come across this. My experience with Hatchbox has been that the walls and top layers were looking good at 200°C, but when I started stress testing the parts to their fail points I noticed that the internals were just a ...


1

I use 205°C for the extruder and 60°C for the bed on my RoBo3D. I also put hot glue stick on the bed to help adhesion and use a brim if it is a small object. I would also check the first layer to see if you need to adjust your z offset. Delamination could be a sign the plastic isn't fusing correctly, which could be both an offset or temperature issue. It ...


1

I use a Wahao Duplicator I3 with a heated bed. I have only used the orange Hatchbox PLA with great results. I use 210°C for the extruder and 55°C for the bed. Speed is 40 mm/s which works well for me.


1

The print you do is a sealed cup in the position it sits directly on the build plate. As a result, there is a column of resin in the cup as you print and at some point, the weakest spot delaminates, the air gets into the column and drains. Take the print and either angle it by a few degrees so the hole in the top becomes a vent or add a tiny extra vent-hole.


1

You could CAD a 1 layer thick cylinder, and add it to your print and place it around your object. You can create any number of cylindrical shells that way...


1

Besides the options of underexposure or bad FEP film, there's also the option of the print being in a bad orientation for printing. Often, the quality gets better if you tilt the model some degrees. You do have to clean up some places, but the stresses from pulling free of the FEP get distributed more evenly and are lower, resulting in generally better ...


1

Thanks to all the replies. Whilst all of them may be valid in some scenarios, my case seemed to have been a combination of things, that relates to most of the replies here. I had my spool holder on the side of the machine, and I noticed some friction as the filament feeded over the "arm" on top of the printer into the extruder. I sat and looked at this for ...


1

I had a similar problem with my prusa i3 variant i built. I found that this issue would decrease in occurance when retraction was disabled however would not completely disappear. After much experimentation I found this to be a feed issue with the extruder. In other words the filament was not being pushed hard enough to the teeth of the hobbed bolt to have ...


1

This looks like a heating or retraction issue. I also have a Di3, and I encountered a similar problem a while ago. I have found that leveling the bed very well and making sure the z-axis is aligned fixes most problems with this machine. Re-calibrate your printer and try out a different slicer. This link from the 3D Printer Wiki is very useful.


1

Delamination should not happen when the temperature is correct. As already pointed out, different temperatures between hot and cold layer cause warping, but warping is not delamination. If you print at the correct temperature (higher for bigger pieces, lower for thin columnar pieces), the layers will stick. This is the procedure to optimise the printing ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible