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8

There are two main special steps to the technique used by most open-source 3d printer controllers: Divide each linear gcode segment into lots of very small subsegments ("Segmentation") Use some basic trigonometry or the pythagorean theorem to tie extruder position to carriage height for each of the three towers ("Inverse Kinematics") to find the target ...


8

I don't know if this is the case with all FLSUN QQ printers, but mine was indeed set to 220v as the instructions/user manual indicated. First I needed to remove the bottom of the printer. Then there was a switch on the side of the power supply with the following label: I know the picture is terrible, but the lighting inside the base of the printer was less ...


6

Slic3r, and all other slicers that I saw, have an option called Skirt that enables your printer to print a number of lines around your object before it starts printing the object itself. This should ensure that both the nozzle is filled with filament and the printer got rid of any burned / dirty filament when it starts printing your object. If you use ...


6

Let's look at various methods: Multiple Hotends The oldest version and one of the best to print materials at vastly different print temperatures (like printing a cheaper PLA infill into a Polycarbonate shell - the print temperature difference is 60-100 °C) is to have 2 or more hotends. This way also avoids the need for purging towers. It does, however, ...


5

After some more testing I checked that the problem shows up only on Z tower and is not related with current. Examining the tower I found very dumb mistake. Pulley on the motor didn't have a setscrew! Don't know how could I missed that. The fact that it could somehow run is even more amazing. Thanks @tom-van-der-zanden and @darthpixel for help. It is for sure ...


5

I had the same problem, and I solved it by changing the Z-Axis Feed Rate to a much higher value (1000 mm/min.) in Repetier Host via Config -> Printer Settings -> Printer.


5

You can achieve this using the G1 command. I don't know your exact printer, but you should be able to use something like this (add to the start G-code in your slicer): G1 X0 Y62 Z0.2 F9000 ; Move slightly past edge of bed G92 E0 ; Zero extruder position G0 E1 F100 ; Extrude 1mm of filament G92 E0 ; Zero again G1 X0 Y0 F9000 ; Move back to center of bed ...


5

A lot of slicers will have a Wipe option. Here are some examples: See Unofficial Simplify3D Documentation. Go to the section talking about Wipe Nozzle, under the heading Extruder Tab Two more ooze-fighting options are Coast at end and Wipe nozzle. Coast turns off the extruder the specified distance before it normally would, to drain what would have oozed ...


5

The short answer is that the handling of the non-cartesian design is done by the motion-control firmware running on the Arduino. The long answer: I don't believe GRBL supports non-cartesian designs, and it is not commonly used for printers. It is more often used for mills, routers, or laser machines. 3D printers will typically use a firmware such as Marlin,...


5

I figured out that the reason is probably a slightly translated slider construction. Instead of using a proper centered slider as shown in red, I used a slider construction like illustrated in yellow. When all sliders are translated on each tower like this, the print should be tilted by the same amount. This seems to have no influence on the general shape of ...


5

user77232's points are valid but I have done several things to mitigate these issues on my Anycubic Deltas. First, both of my deltas have linear slide bearings. If your's has the bearing trucks that run in the extrusion slots this will lead to less precise operation and also is a source of wear over time. Second, be sure that the end stop micro switches ...


4

As a guess, you are using the wrong command. If set for n x n grid, you get 3 point measurement with G29, but that is not auto leveling, it is just setting Z height - based on average height at 3 points. What you need is G32 S2 with S2 to store result in EEPROM (and therefore you should have EEPROM enabled with auto leveling. It is also used to store ...


4

Issues in X-Y size on a Delta are usually the result of an incorrect diagonal rod value in the firmware. This should be easy to fix assuming the rods were built together. The formula for this is (20 in this case is your test print X-Y): New DELTA_DIAGONAL_ROD = 20 / measured_length * Original DELTA_DIAGONAL_ROD I found this information (here), this ...


4

My FLSUN Kossel 3D Delta printer ($224) has a bowden extruder. It works really well too. The main advantage of having one is that it reduces the mass of the hot end. That means less inertia, and it's easier on the driver motors as well. All this leads to (hopefully) greater and more precise control at the extruder tip, and, best of all, faster printing.


4

According to discussions in comments, I'm pretty sure the problem lies in too low current. Please review this answer to How do you make sure you have the right voltage on the trimpots on a A4988 stepper driver?. Why it happens? If there is not enough current then motors can omit some steps as the stress is not equal while going up and down. Sometimes ...


4

It isn't hidden at all. It's just that the Z-axis position only changes with each layer change, so the Z coordinate is only passed at layer change. On line 17 of your example G-code, it starts the first layer at Z=0.5mm: G1 Z0.500 F7800.000 The next time you should expect Z to appear is on the next layer.


4

For anyone having the same issue I found out it was due to a Z axis motor lock up because the pulley attached to it would get stuck under the bed. I found out because I tried to print again and it locked up completely and I had to pull it out with pliers. Just finished an 18 hour print to confirm


4

Do anyone have any ideas? What this can be? How can I fix this? At least judging from the pictures, that does seem like under-extrusion. Some ideas for further investigating the issue. The problem may be due to the gcode being wrong. In this case, your printer is merely executing correctly... the wrong commands. To check if this is the case: The ...


4

(The XYZ Printers are called Cartesian Printers) Delta printers are harder to get right, because they require precision parts. The arms have to be EXACTLY the same length, the frame must be square, the universal joints must have no slop. You should check to see if any of the universal joints need replacing, and that the length of the arms are equal. ...


4

So the problem was that the TMC2208 were wired for UART mode, yet Marlin was configured for standalone, which apparently makes them work, but with completely wrong step sizes. Changing it in the configuration completely eliminated the problem


3

If you properly define your own machine with a delta_wasp.def.json file you can fill in the acceleration and jerk settings of your printer, so that Cura will use the correct values for print time estimation. For example, take a look at how the Ultimaker 2 is defined. Exposing these settings to the Custom FDM Printer wizard hasn't been implemented (yet).


3

i bet your towers are not standing straight (vertical) or your bed is not clearly horizontal i've recreated your picture with some assumptions (for example that your SW calculates properly and your steppers and motors act well) take a look here if you deliver your printer dimensions tower height (from the base) tower distance from the center bed ...


3

You, obviously, do actually have a Z-probe, but in case another user does not, or you decide not to use yours, I will cover both cases (with and without a Z-probe). Z-probe not present If not, then in configuration.h set the FEATURE_Z_PROBE to false, like this: #define FEATURE_Z_PROBE false or #define FEATURE_Z_PROBE 0. Then you also need to set #...


3

I think its only advantage is that it serves to move money from the folks who buy it to the folks that sell it, and that's an advantage purely for the folks that sell it. "Additional heatsink surface area" is quite doubtful - it would have poor coupling to the actual heatsink. If the actual heatsink is correctly designed, there's no need for additional area,...


3

Your included code has a line which reads: G1 Z0.500 I checked a couple of my G-code files for some of the past prints and I was able to identify the bed movement relative to the layer being printed. My slicer (Simplify3D) provides for the bed to drop during certain movements. I found G1 Z0.600 followed by G1 Z0.850 for one of the layers. When that layer ...


3

Skew distortion in deltas means there is something physically wrong with your printer build, such as the towers not being evenly spaced or being tilted. The first thing you should do is confirm the mechanical build -- measure the distance between towers, angles between towers, parallelism of all three towers, and perpendicularity of all three towers to the ...


3

Delta bed leveling has been dodgy in Repetier for a long time. There are a number of fixes occurring in the dev branch right now (June 2016) if you look at Github. So it's getting better, but I wouldn't call it mature yet. (Delta auto-calibration is one of the only big shortcomings of Repetier, in my opinion.) The problem with approaches like bed plane ...


3

Delta printers are considered to be able to be accurate printers cause of the limited weight in the head (using Bowden extruder setup). The positioning can be very accurate (limited weight, limited overshooting) and because of the limited amount of weight, the print speed can be increased. An interesting paper has been written on a comparative study between ...


3

To answer this question for anyone who will find this of use, I printed this calibration cube at 25mm to a side (125% scale in Cura) with my Kossel Plus using the following settings: 0.08 mm layer height 45 mm/s print speed 200°C extruder temperature with PLA Based on articles I read, I wanted to play it safe with the speed, staying well below the printer'...


3

Delta bots always need all motors to step to maintain a straight level. Microstepping, is not magic, the incremental torque decreases per step so that you will be more likely to miss a few micro-steps. Furthermore, the signal that creates voltages for the micro-step positioning is usually not perfectly sinusoidal (pulse-width voltage modulation is used to ...


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