21

From a general point of view, there are a few things to consider. If you buy a kit: Pros: You get some insurance that you have all the parts that you need to get a functional printer - all the electronics, structure, bolts, nuts, screws, washers, wires and so on. Most likely, all the parts you get are made to fit together. You will (usually) get a manual, ...


14

I am going to answer this as someone who actually did rework their Prusa i3 fleabay clone to use leadscrews for all axes. Before digging into the matter, the backlash issue can be solved easily with spring-loaded brass nuts, kinda like how ballscrews work. That's the simplest problem to solve though as there are a lot of other issues. Short version / tl;dr ...


11

Actually no. It will take slightly more for each addition. You also then have the point of failure, where one gets knocked off and ruins all the prints. The fastest way to print multiple objects is one at a time. In fact slic3r lets you do just that with their sequential printing feature. The reason is, the time it takes to lift 0.5mm, travel the few MM over ...


10

I built my first printer from scratch, though it's fairly similar to an oversize MendelMax 2. It was a good learning experience, but very frustrating at times. Overall, I think I'm glad I did it that way, but a kit would have gotten me printing much faster and a bit cheaper. Here are my main impressions from the experience... You should already be familiar ...


10

Why is this so rare? Such kind of printers usually harder to assembles, calibrate, and maintain because 3 axes machine is a bit more complex than 2 axes. For instance, it's can be tricky to move an entire extruder among all 3 axis and some of such printer's designs may require even dedicated exruder's design like Bowden Extruders. Are there flaws in this ...


8

What you purchased is probably a bed that can be configured for either 110V or for 220V, depending on how you hook up the wires: the bed contains two heating elements, hooking these up in parallel gives you the 110V version, hooking them up in series gives you the 220V one. If you attempt to use this bed with a 24V supply it won't work. The power dissipated ...


7

Yes. Look up Arduino Ramps 1.4 http://reprap.org/wiki/RAMPS_1.4 Following the programing is all done for you in the firmware. That said you can edit it. Just open the firmware files -- it is compiled when you upload them. Generally however one usually sticks to the preferences header alone.. http://reprap.org/wiki/List_of_Firmware Over all you are ...


7

This looks a lot like under extrusion caused by heat creep. Heat creep is when the nozzle temperature 'creeps' up through the filament and makes it melt (a bit) and form a blob (or just widen enough to get stuck) a centimeter or two before the nozzle. The characteristic is usually that everything works perfectly well for some quite fix amount of time, then ...


7

In principle you only need the minimum axis position (or the maximum), the offset to the bed and the size of the bed in the direction of the axes. Fortunately, you can specify this in the firmware: E.g. in Marlin Firmware offsets are defined as travel limits: // Travel limits (mm) after homing, corresponding to endstop positions. #define X_MIN_POS -33 #...


7

As a frame challenge, they kind of are. It's just that the optimal, and in some sense only reasonable, design for a fixed build platform that doesn't move on any axis is the delta robot geometry. This design is not the most popular, but it's far from obscure - there are lots of cheap entry-level delta printers available as well as higher-end ones. What makes ...


6

Following on from Harvey Lim's answer, to give a concrete example of a DIY filter, which uses active carbon, see ABS 3d Printer Nanoparticle and Chemical Exhaust Air Filter: Description Enclose your 3d printer and use this exhaust air filter along with a recirculating air filter to eliminate nanoparticles and chemical fumes. 95 to 99.5% of partilces ...


6

The main consideration when building the body/frame of a 3D printer is the stiffness. The stiffer the material, the less the frame will deform under load, and the more accurate and repeatable your results will be. UHMW has a Tensile Modulus of Elasticity around 120,000 psi (http://www.polytechindustrial.com/products/plastic-stock-shapes/uhmw-polyethylene) ...


6

A few months ago I bought a cheap (220 USD) Prusa i3 kit from China and put it together. Putting it together was fun and still a bit of a challenge. It was also nice to have pre-configured firmware already loaded onto the Melzi board that came with it. So for the downside: The board (Melzi) that came in the kit only supports one extruder so if I want to add ...


6

Printing multiple parts can save you time. The issues pointed out by the other posters are all bang on, but one factor that has been neglected is the time it takes you to clear the build plate and restart the print. I found for smaller parts (under 1 inch cube) printing several parts at a time was more convenient, and minimally faster. The time saved came ...


6

To answer the main question "Is ABS better for structural parts of a 3D printer as opposed to PLA". The answer, unfortunately is it depends. ABS has lower yield and ultimate strengths compared to PLA. This means that at room temperatures, ABS is weaker than PLA. However the difference between yield and ultimate for ABS is much larger than PLA, meaning that ...


6

Building a 3-D printer is actually very easy, assuming that you are electronically and mechanically competent, and there are a whole bunch of websites devoted to doing just that. The principal of which would be the RepRapWiki. There are a number of different designs, mostly from a few basic designs: Cartesian Delta Polar Scara Take a look at 3D Printers ...


6

Possible causes for the printer not printing correct dimensions: Incorrect number of steps/mm in firmware settings Belts are not tight enough Pulley slips on the shaft Looking at the picture, I would go for the first case, because distortion looks regular. Try checking microstep settings on your board, and settings in the firmware.


6

You are suffering from what is called "heat creep". Molten filament is creeping up the heat break and into the bowden tube, where it is causing a jam. You need to install a proper radiator block that is cooled by a fan, not just a lump of wood as a "cold end". The cold end is not just a connector, its primary purpose is to act as a cooler. A hot end on its ...


6

My question is a ball screw of pitch 4mm or 5mm, will it be able to Maintain it's position when motor is deenergized under a load of 15 kg shared by two systems. The detent torque of a typical NEMA 23 stepper varies between around 3 and 7 N·cm. This is the torque produced when the windings are not energized. Using this leadscrew torque calculator, you can ...


6

The second motor is hot. And the third is very hot. I can not even touch it. This is to some degree, completely normal and expected. From the datasheet for a typical NEMA 17 stepper, the rated temperature rise is 80 °C above ambient and the maximum operating temperature is 130 °C (implying an ambient temperature of 50 °C). It is normal that stepper motors (...


6

In addition to cost, backlash, which can be experienced in the Z-axis where threaded rods and leadscrews are mostly commonly used, would/could become an issue. The elasticity of GT2 belts generally avoids this issue for the X and Y axes. It would be worth reading Tom's answer to Advantages of GT2 over a rack, which while the question was related to Rack and ...


5

Yes, and no. It depends. For FDM printing, the printing time mostly scales linearly with the number of objects. However, some printers have a "minimum layer time" whereby smaller layers are printed more slowly, to ensure each layer takes at least this minimum time. This gives the print enough time to cool. Since the model shown in your example is quite ...


5

From Accuracy vs Precision and Threaded Rod vs Leadscrews in 3D Printers. I have highlighted the relevant parts: In general, FFF/FDM printers use relatively infrequent, small, precise movements on the z-axis and consistent, fast movements on the x and y axes. A single start leadscrew with the tightest pitch possible (highest thread density, smallest pitch) ...


5

Hard to say for sure - my whole printer is cheap parts bought as a kit in China by a Chinese student who abandoned it in the US (I resurrected it after it was abandoned.) It includes all the parts you list, and I think we finally sorted out what the thermistor actually is so the temperatures are more accurate now. It prints. Could it print better? - ...


5

No, this module is completely useless for your intended purpose. The load side is marked with "5A 5-220VDC". This means it can only switch up to 5A, maximum. The heated bed draws more than twice this current.


5

as long as you match the parts that is ok. The m8 rod will give you more stiffness and will be harder to bend. As the result, you will have to calibrate the steps/mm settings in the firmware.


5

The biggest issue with RAMPS 1.4 (and 1.5) is the power connector is prone to melting/burning, this appears to be fixed on 1.6 with the use of screw terminal blocks. I've used RAMPS 1.4 with both 12v and 24v power supplies and never have had any issues with the fuses or the power connector but mine have only come from Ultimachine or RepRapDiscount. A RAMPS ...


5

The short answer is that the handling of the non-cartesian design is done by the motion-control firmware running on the Arduino. The long answer: I don't believe GRBL supports non-cartesian designs, and it is not commonly used for printers. It is more often used for mills, routers, or laser machines. 3D printers will typically use a firmware such as Marlin,...


5

PVA is nasty filament to print (from experience). I use it in the Ultimaker 3 in a separate designed core (BB) and even with that core the filament frequently cooks up and carbonizes clogging the nozzle resulting in grinding of the filament at the feeder (it also attracts water really easy, so keep it in the bag with desiccant bags). To clean the inside of ...


5

Basically, your setup is the following: The overhang of the bed, assuming the bearings are in the center, equals (300-105)/2 = 97.5 mm on each side. So the distance from the leftmost bearing face (when bed is at y = 0 mm) to the center of the Y rods assembly equals 300 - 97.5 = 202.5 mm. Knowing this distance for the other side of the center to the right ...


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