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9

Taken in order your questions: Maintenance for a resin printer means keeping the vat or tray clean, using appropriate methods to remove the unused resin (or leaving it in the vat per manufacturer's directions). Cleaning the tray should be done also per manufacturer's spec, although each printer's user forum may provide better or more effective options. The ...


6

DLP doesn't use "melted polymer". It uses a photosenstive resin which is at room temperature and polymerizes when exposed to (UV) light. At no point is any material melted. As such, steel or carbon fiber can not be used as these materials are not photosensitive.


3

SLS uses a high powered laser to smelt the binder of a ceramic or the metal itself. We are talking about at least a 40 W laser which focuses its power on a circle of about 50 µm. How much power are we talking about with that lowest viable laser for plastic SLS? $\frac{40\ \text{W}}{\pi \ 62.5\times 10^-9\ \text{m}^2}=640\times 10^6 \frac{\text{W}}{\text{m}²}...


3

I would personally stick to isopropanol. Be aware that 3D printing is a very expensive hobby, but health wise this is a better option. Methylated spirits can quickly become dangerous, and often can burn with a close to invisible flame, meaning that you may not even see if it is burning. Also, the fumes can quickly become dangerous, whereas after years of ...


3

I have no experience with either GRBL or DLP printers, but the M7 M8 M9 coolant control codes should be able to be sent by NanoDLP to GRBL. Those seem to allow for direct digital output. Apparently you can set the pin you want them to use in the cpu_map.h file, with the standard being Analog Pins 3 and 4 for the M8 and M7 commands respectively. // Define ...


3

Despite how many vendors make it appear, resin-curing SLA/DLP printers are industrial or commercial tools that are really not suitable for home desktop use. Here are the major downsides: Significantly more expensive to operate than FDM printers, in most cases. The resin is seriously toxic until fully cured. Fumes can be an issue for users handling raw ...


3

I think you will find that it will be necessary for you to tune your own printer to a specific resin. Even as important, you would expect to have different parameters for different colors of resin, as each will absorb the UV to a different degree. You haven't provided parameters in your request for which resin to use. You will consider availability and cost ...


2

This test is not just a verification solid, is a program that tries different exposures and shows them all side by side: https://github.com/altLab/photon-resin-calibration The test doesn't move slower and slower, but it does something equivalent: keeps the plate in the same position while changing the bitmap. EDIT I tried the test, and I'm not happy about ...


2

Since every printer is slightly different (light intensity, for example), you probably want to run one of those 12-spot test patterns where each "spot" gets a different exposure time, then see what time works best. I found a more general test pattern at Amerilabs Calibration File which may be useful. Not to mention a zillion other test patterns


2

This is a guess but it may be a problem with the sliced file. Take a look though the layers of the sliced file to see if your software is adding a layer there. sometimes it looks fine in the 3d model but it can add a layer while slicing.


2

Formlabs sells a completely clear resin that they've even made simple lenses from, but it's about $150 for a liter. I have no idea how well it would work with your DLP setup. Looks amazing in the pictures though. MatterHackers sells PhotoCentric UV Firm Clear for $90 for a liter as well. It's not quite as easy finding pictures of this stuff, but from what ...


2

I finally reached out to anycubic and their tech support answered and was awesome! They had me update the firmware, tighten the fep film more ( instead of using the small lever I used the big lever this time), then level the bed again. I printed their test print and it worked! After that I looked at their parameters and I saw that mine were very different. ...


2

When using a DLP 3D printer, a projector (or other UV light source) is shining on a layer of resin. As the light source shines on a whole layer at a time, it is able to print at a rather constant linear vertical rate. This rate is normally around 2.5 cm (1 inch)/hour When comparing this to a standard FDM printer or a single laser system (such as the Pegasus ...


1

It's almost always what you call system 2: The LCD screen is acting as a "mask" for the UV backlight, which is a strong bulb under it. This also is the reason that the screen degrades over time and that the machines need replacement bulbs: the heat from the UV source burns out the screen and itself over time. Both parts are consumable, just like ...


1

Yes, it seems to be. I tried the test and it worked well.


1

Q1: Printrun is 3D printer host software written in Python with limited DLP support. You can checkout how it display layers. NanoDLP directly talk to GPU through Dispmanx which makes it Raspberry Pi only. Q2: Printrun supports SVG. To convert SVG (multi-layer) to PNG you can use ImageMagick cli tools, you should consider your projector resolution too.


1

If what Thomas Sanladerer states is correct, the Mars 2 Pro (monochrome LCD, no color filter) has a layer time approximately 1/3 as long as the Mars/Pro printers (where color LCDs are used): This would indicate that the light passing through the LCD, when the color filter is present, is 1/3. Put it in other words, only ONE ...


1

I get best results from sun curing by putting it in water in the sun for 20-30 min. I personally do not like Monocure Red one. I find the Nova3D prints better, has a lower oder, and cheaper.


1

I've created software to do just that. See the project on Github: CreateMask. It has a wiki page that explains what to do. To summarize: you measure the LCD build area using a multi-meter and a light dependent resistor. You do this with low and high intensity masks. You feed the numbers in CSV files to the software, and the software will generate a mask for ...


1

If you have a makerspace in your area, you'll likely find individuals with reasonable mechanical skills suitable for simple kit assembly. Most kits are engineered to be reasonable assembly, not rocket surgery. Makers are by nature capable of construction, often from raw materials, and kits are typically not particularly challenging comparatively speaking. ...


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