Hot answers tagged

9

Yes, you can increase retraction past E3D's max 2 mm recommendation to compensate for Bowden tube stretch and slop. The reason for the recommendation is that jams will occur with most all-metal hot ends if you pull molten filament up into the cold zone. Any molten filament that enters the cold zone rapidly cools and hardens and sticks to the walls, very ...


9

You can either flip the connector for the motor around (i.e. plug it in backwards) or (if you are using Marlin firmware) look for the following line in configuration.h: (using the Arduino editor open the Marlin file For your 3D Printer, one of the tabs is labelled "configuration.h" click on that tab to bring it to the front for editing. use the Edit, Find ...


7

You may need to secure the pneumatic coupling in the closed position with a small plastic clip (which should be supplied with the hot end). You can print your own, providing that your printer will work for long enough (a paper clip might do the trick): Thingiverse: Bowden Tube Clip v3 Addendum: Some pneumatic couplers are sprung, so that you have to ...


7

As pointed out by this article, you can try to: Increase your speed for travel moves Increase retraction length Place objects strategically during print 1. Calibrating travel speed When calibrating travel speed, you can work with: Maximum travel speed Acceleration Jerk Z-hop/lift * I found this acceleration calculator (by RepRap Central) and video (by ...


5

Usually there is no need to clean the hotend, as filament sticks well to itself rather than to the inside of the hotend. If there are remains - the simplest way to clean it up is to extrude 5-10 cm of new filament, which will gather all remainings clean the hotend. The above concerns changing filament in the same group of plastic. So if you print PLA you ...


5

As the filament in the melt chamber heats up, it's going to inevitably ooze a little bit. Make sure you watch for this and clean it off as the hot-end heats up, and setup you slicing software to print a skirt, which will print a few loops around the outside of your print, separated by a few mm, to deal with ooze and get filament flowing properly. If it ...


4

How does this happen? For melted filament to leak around the heat break threads, it has to first get through the metal-to-metal machined surface joint where the heat break contacts the nozzle. Given this keeps happening, the problem must be a systematic error of some kind. Thermal Cycling Based on your description of your installation procedure (heat to 285 ...


4

While most components (cooling body, heatblock, heater cartridges, thermistors) of knockoff e3d-v6 hotends can be similar enough to not notice in a large part, or at least functionally the same. Note that I don't say the parts are necessarily interchangeable - a lot what is sold under the name is not what it claims to be. The main distinguishing difference ...


4

Try to, First, remove the heat block from the extruder/heat sink. Heat the hot end to ~ 230 'C. Then try to unscrew the nozzle while holding the heat block with a wrench or plier. Be extra careful with the heat block and with the plier.


4

To my experience, there is absolutely no problem in increasing retraction in E3D assemblies up to at least 5 mm. Typical retraction distance for my Bowden system is 3.5 mm (ABS). Clogging may occur after a series of retracts when thermal break doesn't have enough time to cool itself down. To avoid clogging when there is a real need in long retracts ...


4

In addition to the already excellent answers above, I want to mention that maybe a change in hotend temperature (lower) can also help reducing ooze/stringing. That is, if not other parameters prevent that.


2

I'm not certain exactly what you're asking, but I'll give this a try. If I've misunderstood, please give more details. It sounds like you're upgrading to the E3D v6. If so, the heater, thermistor, and fans should connect to the same places as the previous ones did. The exception would be if you had thermocouples instead of thermistors before; that's a more ...


2

As Anton mentions, cleaning your nozzle is commonly done using a cold pull (or atomic pull). This process involves pulling out your filament from the nozzle while it is still semi-hot. (PLA, for instance will often be pulled at 80-90 celsius, which is the temperature at which it will slowly start to soften.) The reason why this works is because the filament ...


2

Periodic temperature irregularities, such as cycling between a higher temperature and lower temperature slowly enough that it spends at least a layer or two at a different temperature than other layers has a tendency to be mistaken for z wobble. You can actually intentionally modulate print temperature (at least of PLA) every few layers to great a sort of ...


2

I have had one roll of filament that did this. I'd get a jam, clean it out, and immediately jam again. I got the filament from a friend who had reported problems using it, but I thought, "I have a Prusa3D i3m3-mmu2, I can print with anything." Unfortunately, I could not. I threw away the filament (first I've ever jetisoned so callously), replaced the ...


2

Verification: When you tighten the nozzle against the heat break, the nozzle is not tightened completely against the heater block. If the nozzle tightens completely against the heater block, it will not finish tightening against the heat break. Note: the heat break is thin between the heater block and heat sink to minimize conduction of heat. Over-...


2

There are many types of heatbreak clones. In cour case, your clone effectively turns your hotend into an e3d Lite6, not an all-metal e3d v6. To function properly, the PTFE liner needs to butt against the nozzle or you will quickly develop leak and clog issues. This means, handle it like a Lite6, which has a max of 245 °C listed, but under usual operation ...


2

It depends how deep it goes. If the teflon goes into the hotend then yes, it will limit the temperature end. But: the teflon may just be something that ends somewhere in the cold side and sticks out so there is something to put into the extruder or higher up into the connector. I cam currently setting up a Slice Mosquito for a Bondtech DDX. The Mosquito is ...


1

It turned out that the stepper driver on my duet 2 wifi board is defective which resulted in the extruder motor being poorly controlled which in turn caused the clogs, using a different stepper driver fixed the issue. I am a bit bummed out that one of my drivers turned out to be defective since the board has barely been used but at least I got my printer to ...


1

Yes, but... Technically, you can reuse your old heater block and nozzles and just buy a new heartbreak and cooling body or the other way around. However, you might run into problems under working conditions, especially if you install the heater block together with its native heating cartridge and thermosensor. Installing a thermosensor to which the printer ...


1

As this is material dependant, you are facing not a printer, but a settings issue: your slicer needs the right settigns to print PETG. The first layers look good, but then we get signs of stringy printing. Stringy printing usually happens if the filament comes out of the nozzle too cold (I had tried to print PLA at 170 °C and it would look somewhat similar) ...


1

I have seen this a lot of times on my tronXY-X1 with an e3d-v6 via Bowden tube. It is not related to retraction but a different settin: Your first layer is set too thin or not leveled to the right height. Having the first layer too thin, means that with a tiny error, the calculated correct extrusion becomes either a massive overextrusion or a barely ...


1

Filament sometimes get stuck on the rim of the PTFE tubes inside the heat sink. Josef Prusa from Prusa Research has published a document on how you should chamfer the PTFE tubes for his printers: Maybe chamfering your tubes works for you too.


1

Major factors affecting extrusion: Nozzle diameter Extrusion ratio Extrusion stepper calibration Filament actual diameter Extrusion width setting Nozzle temperature According to the photos, temperature is acceptable (may be a bit high, but it is not a problem in this case). Extrusion ratio is 1 and should not be changed in normal operation. Extrusion width ...


1

For reference, I have the same printer and am speaking from my experiences. You have two routes you can take with this, but both are effectively the same result - you need to replace the X carriage. If you want to re-use your existing extruder components you can pull the MK8 extruder off the X carriage and use it as the extruder to drive a bowden ...


1

One possible solution is to "park" the hotend on the print bed as it is heating up. The bed blocks the nozzle, and prevents ooze from coming out. If any does come up, it tends to stick to the bed, not to the nozzle. You can do this by including an appropriate G1 command in your start G-code.


1

I've found a blow torch to work pretty well for clogged nozzles. Note: If your hotend use PTFE tubing internally DONT DO THIS or it may melt and ruin the nozzle.


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