18

It is hard to tell whether you personally should enclose your printer. However, you asked for the advantages and I will name some of them on which one can base a decision. A 3D printer enclosure helps to keep the temperature of the whole print at controlled levels, if you use a heating element, thermocouple and pid regulator. This is one of the most direct ...


11

It depends on how often you use your printer, meaning how many particles does your printer emit for time-unit. If you print nonstop with 5 printers then it's a different situation, opposite to one print per week. Best material for passive filtering is carbon foam. It has the ability to capture chemical fumes. See this filter comparison. Having an enclosure ...


11

My residential materials expert referred me to these links (3D Printing Fume Extraction Solutions, and ABS 3d Printer Nanoparticle and Chemical Exhaust Air Filter) and thinks that you're pretty much on track with the idea of using activated carbon. We both primarily print with ABS with my Replicator Dual and what's worked enough for me (in the past 5 years) ...


10

@kamuro provided an excellent answer, so I'll just try to add by playing devil's advocate. Possible things to look out for: Inappropriate enclosure could result in more temperature differences, resulting in higher rates of warping and delamination. For example, if you do not enclose the top of your machine, then the temperature at the beginning of your ...


9

One of the options you have would be to create a negative pressure in your working area. This would be accomplished by installing a fan with the flow direction to the outside. The inside portion of the fan should have ducting that terminates near your printer. You could place your printer in something elaborate, or in something as simple as a large cardboard ...


7

Following on from Harvey Lim's answer, to give a concrete example of a DIY filter, which uses active carbon, see ABS 3d Printer Nanoparticle and Chemical Exhaust Air Filter: ###Description Enclose your 3d printer and use this exhaust air filter along with a recirculating air filter to eliminate nanoparticles and chemical fumes. 95 to 99.5% of partilces up ...


7

There is no requirement for an enclosure when printing ABS. Like many things in FDM, there are improvements to be made, but there is a scale of what is possible. A heated bed is much more necessary (for similar reasons, the thermal expansion is significant and without a heated bed you have very high risk of warping). An enclosure is important for high ...


6

First things first: Resin is very aggressive. It can very easily make you hypersensitive, even to the fumes of it. So step 1 is easy: Limit exposure Wear gloves when working with resin. As you live with your printer in the same room, bottle up the resin right after use and only open it during use to prevent buildup over time and exposure. To further reduce ...


6

Sort of related, see the answers to: Commercially available 3D printer fume and UFP extractor, and; What are the best air filtration options for enclosures? Addressing your points in turn: Ventilation - Probably not, as you want to keep the print warm. However, when printing with filaments where well ventilated conditions are recommended1, to prevent the ...


6

The answer is "No" you don't need a heated bed for PLA but it does make the base layer a little easier to lay down and also helps with print removal post print. PLA is a very easy filament to work with and the majority of PLA printers don't come with heated beds and suggest blue tape and/or elmers glue. You may find that if you are purchasing very cheap/...


6

I have looked into this a lot. Especially when I had a phd chem engineer girlfriend who kept talking about how the fumes might give me cancer.. Frankly the system you need just costs too much. Lab equipment can run 20k easily. Not to mention the noise. What you really need is a backyard shed, but as one who lives where it snows I understand that is rarely a ...


5

I was very concerned about this issue when I bought my own 3d printer, so I decided to design fumes extraction solution for this. It is tailored only for my Zortrax M200 but I hope that it is good example of how to solve this problem with limited budget. http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1158639


5

Hardboard is called Masonite here in the States because that is the trade name of the product. If you look up the Material Safety Data Sheet you will see Masonite it states the following (Section 5): Auto-ignition Temperature (°C): >200 degrees Celsius In Section 7, it states: These boards are flammable but difficult to ignite. Furthermore in Section ...


4

Masonite or hardboard is a high-density board without a resin. It is listed at around 200 to 275 °C for its autoignition temperature. Just for comparison, let's look at similar products. Medium-density fiberboard (MDF) is similar to hardboard but bonded with a resin, offering a smoother surface and is listed at 200 to 275 °C, so pretty close. The heavier ...


3

According to MatterHackers, Simplify3D, and 3D Insider an enclosure is not necessary but highly recommended as ASA, like ABS, is susceptible to drafts and can warp. A heated bed is necessary (somewhere between 90-110 °C), and little-to-no cooling fan used. The enclosure helps ensure adhesion and a consistent temperature. ASA also has fumes and an enclosure ...


3

Air flows from places of higher pressure to those of less. Minimal setup I propose to look at a very simple setup which works for short lengths of pipe: Choose if you want a radial fan of a direct passing fan. get one, measure the intake and the outlet side holes cut a fan inlet-sized hole directly into the back of the enclosure. mount your fan onto it, ...


3

I print ABS in my basement in an unenclosed Prusa3D i3m3s, just as I print other filaments. Perhaps an enclosure would be helpful, but I don't have problems as it is. Your experience may vary. Before that I printed ABS on a large home-brew delta machine. No problems related to lack of enclosure. Before that I printed ABS on a Thing-o-Matic, also with no ...


3

I designed this self-printable filter enclosure. Rather than vent any air outside the printer enclosure, this will recirculate the air within, constantly running the air through the filter while at the same time conserving the heat needed for ABS prints. It's simple, and you can employ more than one of these or, using my design files, extend the size of ...


3

Make sure and pay attention to safety. I have heard of more than one report of a RepRap printer going up in flames. On example of that is if the thermistor fails, or gets disconnected, and the controller puts the bed, or extruder, into thermal runaway. Make you make the enclosure out of a non-combustible material, so you don't add any fuel to the fire.


2

Dust collectors, fume extractors, and mist collectors for other industrial processes like welding, machining, and woodworking start at a few thousand dollars. The Allerair AirMedic Pro 6 (formerly 6000 series) is available from as low as $600. It is marketed in some places as an air purifier but others as a general purpose air filter. In any case it uses ...


2

At the current moment, commercial fume extractors are quite rare in the market, but there are companies releasing some this year (like the 3DKreator's SYNE system). However all commercial forms of it are quite expensive. What I would do would be using an active carbon filter with a fan.


2

There is problem with sticking to bed without preheat, PLA is possible to print on Kapton tape with no-heated bed. Or there are other tapes dedicated for printing. da Vinci 1.0w is good for small models with PLA. ABS is not possible with no heated bed.


2

For ABS, if you are using an air filter, you do NOT want ventilation, because ABS prints are better quality if the ambient temperature is up at 50°C (or even warmer), and ventilation will reduce your chamber temperature. Whatever has been helping for noise cancelling now should work in the future.


2

If you want to have an enclosure without actually building one, you can try a server cabinet. Just take out the server racks and use it as an enclosure. And, as there are many server cabinets available, you could probably find one that suits your needs. Currently, I have my FlyingBear P902 3d printer enclosed in a server cabinet. And, although the doors and ...


2

Well you can get a centrifugal fan and put it at either end of the pipe. You didn't specify a pipe diameter so I'll assume it's 1 inch. Just hook the pipe up to the exhaust. You will have to design and print an adapter.


2

When printing PLA you do not require an enclosure! PLA does not shrink as much as e.g. ABS. When printing PLA you should definitely ventilate your casing. I guess your steppers are also located in the enclosure, so you should be careful of not overheating the enclosure. Not only the steppers, but also think of the cold end cooling, too much heat in the ...


2

Sides without a top will help. Sides with a top will help more. Do you need either? That depends. How warm, how dry, how drafty is your printing room?


2

From experience I can tell you that boxing it up completely is not always a good thing to do. I have covered the front and top of an Ultimaker 3E printer to find out after some printing time that the cold ends weren't getting enough cooling, so I ended up clogging the nozzle assembly, preventing finishing the print. If you need to box it up to create a ...


2

It depends on what kinds of prints you make, and especially what kind of materials you want to use. Certain materials (ABS especially, but also PETG to some degree) will print much better if the entire build area, which usually includes the printer chassis and controls, is enclosed to protect from drafts and allow a much higher ambient temperature. If you ...


1

There's a type of 1/2" insulation foam available in the US that my shop uses. Here's a link to it at Home Depot. It's pretty tough so long as you aren't hanging things off it, and you could build a frame out of 2"x4" beams to pressure fit squares in there. It's also massively sound dampening.


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